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Ideal Protein vs. Atkins

by
author image Christina Schnell
Christina Bednarz Schnell began writing full-time in 2010. Her areas of expertise include child development and behavior, medical conditions and pet health. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations.
Ideal Protein vs. Atkins
Chicken and vegetable kebabs. Photo Credit BevLinder/iStock/Getty Images

At first glance, the Adkins diet and the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method appear similar. Both weight loss plans were developed by a physician and each requires excluding certain foods over a four-phase plan. This is where the similarities end. Which foods are allowed and how easy it is to access detailed instructional information differ significantly, as do the core principles of fat and protein intake. Because both diets restrict entire food groups for extended periods of time, it is essential that you speak with your physician before beginning either.

Instruction & Monitoring

Everything you need to understand about doing the Adkins diet is available through the instructional book, "Doctor Adkins New Diet Revolution." The widely circulated instructional book and numerous informational websites allow anyone to research and begin the Adkins diet. In contrast, you must join one of the many affiliated Ideal Weight Loss Centers to receive specific instructions for Ideal Protein. While the Adkins diet encourages monitoring your progress through food journals and counting carbohydrates, Ideal Protein requires working with a weight loss coach at an affiliated Ideal Weight Loss Center.

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Food Accessibility & Flexibility

The food you'll eat on the Adkins diet is available at any common grocery store. Eating out while following the Adkins diet might require ordering a dish without pasta or skipping the bread basket, but any restaurant that serves meat and vegetables likely has something Adkins-friendly on the menu. Comparatively, the first two phases of Ideal Protein require replacing two meals a day with Ideal Protein powdered shakes and vacuum packaged meals. You must purchase these special products through the Ideal Protein website or from your weight loss coach at an Ideal Weight Loss Center.

Protein Limits

Adkins requires consuming a minimum of 4 to 8 ounces of meat or eggs during each meal and never limits the amount of protein you can consume. Not surprisingly, it is generally characterize Adkins as a high-protein diet because it encourages eating more protein than your body needs. Conversely, Ideal Protein operates on the principle that consuming anything in excess, including protein, hinders losing weight. For this reason, Ideal Protein limits your dietary protein to approximately 20 grams per day, which is the minimum amount necessary to prevent muscle loss.

Fat Limits

The Ideal Protein forces you to burn existing body fat by limiting the fat in your diet. Each stage of Ideal Protein includes eating essential fatty acids -- those your body cannot manufacture itself, contained in foods such as fish, flaxseed, canola and olive oil, walnuts and sunflower seeds, among others -- but low-fat food is the rule. This contrasts sharply with the Atkins diet perspective, which teaches that fats such as those in butter, cheese and whipping cream are necessary fuels once your body begins burning fat, not carbohydrates, for energy. Not only does the Adkins diet permit eating high-fat and untrimmed meats, the website recommends adding butter or oil to lean meat dishes.

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References

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