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Homemade Volleyball Poles

author image Frank Whittemore
In Jacksonville, Fla., Frank Whittemore is a content strategist with over a decade of experience as a hospital corpsman in the U.S. Navy and a licensed paramedic. He has over 15 years experience writing for several Fortune 500 companies. Whittemore writes on topics in medicine, nature, science, technology, the arts, cuisine, travel and sports.
Homemade Volleyball Poles
Homemade volleyball poles are easy to make and convenient to use. Photo Credit volleyball net with palm trees in the backgound image by jeff gynane from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Barbecues, parties and another get-togethers with friends and family is a great time to play volleyball. With sufficient yard, space a good volleyball game can be very enjoyable. However, most people don't want a permanent volleyball net in their yard. No problem. A pair of portable volleyball poles can be easily constructed from a couple of old tires.


The design of a homemade volleyball pole is simple. A rubber tire acts as the base for the pole. Cement is poured into the tire to work as a weight and the means to hold a post, which will then hold the net.


The materials needed to build homemade volleyball poles include two old tires. The tires should be the same size and dimensions and should have sufficient tread on them so the steel belts within the tire are not exposed. Two 8 1/2-foot lengths of pressure-treated 4x4 posts, four large eye screws and add a couple of bags of cement are also required.


A shovel and wheelbarrow or other container will be required to mix the cement. A carpenter's level is useful tool for truing the posts as the cement sets. An electric drill and bit are also useful to start a pilot hole for the eye screws that will hold the net.


To construct the pole, mix one bag of cement. Place the tire on its inside on a flat area on the ground. Place the end of one of the posts into the center of the tire. Ensure that the post is true on all sides. While one person holds the pole, another person can shovel the cement into the tire. Continue to fill the tire with cement until it reaches the inside rim of the tire. Hold the post steady until the cement sets. Allow the cement to cure for 24 hours. Once the concrete has cured, the pole can be tipped over on its side. Drill a pilot hole in the side of the post, 6 inches from the top, and screw in one of the eye screws. Drill another pilot hole, 40 inches from the first hole, and screw in another eye screw. Repeat this process to construct the second pole.

Setup and Use

Once your poles are completed, you can place than anywhere in your yard. The easiest way to set up the poles is to position one pole, then attach the net to that pole. Attach the net to the other pole, then move that pole away until the net is stretched tightly between them.

Moving and Storage

Moving homemade volleyball poles is relatively easy. Tip the pole over so the tire rests on the tread. Now roll the pole to turn the tire. You will be able to steer the pole, as it rolls, to position it for setup to play volleyball or to move it to a convenient location for storage. Because the materials are weather resistant, these volleyball poles can be stored outside.

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