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Personal Hygiene in Teenagers

author image Julie Boehlke
Julie Boehlke is a seasoned copywriter and content creator based in the Great Lakes state. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists. Boehlke has more than 10 years of professional writing experience on topics such as health and wellness, green living, gardening, genealogy, finances, relationships, world travel, golf, outdoors and interior decorating. She has also worked in geriatrics and hospice care.
Personal Hygiene in Teenagers
Good hygiene becomes very important in the teen years. Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images

As an older child becomes a teen, several changes happen within the human body. Sweat glands in the armpits and genitals begin to secrete an unpleasant odor as hormone levels begin to fluctuate. Teenagers must begin to wear deodorant and shower daily to combat odor and be presentable to others. Parents can help teens take the right steps when it comes to proper personal hygiene.

Start Young

Personal Hygiene in Teenagers
Supply nice-smelling soaps, body washes and shampoos. Photo Credit Purestock/Purestock/Getty Images

One of the best ways to get your teen to develop good personal hygiene habits is to start teaching them responsible body care at an early age. Some kids don’t like to shower or bathe daily because they are too busy playing or spending time with friends. Supply nice-smelling soaps, body washes and shampoos to encourage cleanliness and make bath time something to look forward to. A special washcloth or shower brush can also prompt kids to get cleaned up and establish an everyday routine. Making these tasks routine early on will carry into the teen years and adulthood.

Do as I Do

Personal Hygiene in Teenagers
Take the time to take care of yourself and your children will notice. Photo Credit Goodshoot/Goodshoot/Getty Images

Kids and teens learn from observation. This means that parents should also engage in regular, consistent personal hygiene practices. For girls, washing, brushing and styling hair is important for moms to do in front of their children. Take the time to take care of yourself and your children will notice. How to trim nails, apply body lotion and brush teeth are all learned behaviors that many girls and teens observe from their mother or older sisters. For boys, shaving and trimming side burns can be observed from male figures in the family.

The Right Tools

One of the most important things a parent or caregiver can do for a teen is to provide them with the right tools for hygiene. This means buying teenagers their own hygiene products. Keep razors, shaving cream, deodorant, shampoos, perfumes, nail trimmers, scissors, skin care lotion and toothbrushes in a convenient location for teenagers to use on a daily basis.

Routine Maintenance

Personal Hygiene in Teenagers
For teenagers, establishing a hygiene routine is important. Photo Credit CandyBoxImages/iStock/Getty Images

For teenagers, establishing a hygiene routine is important. This means showering at the same time each day. Some teenagers may also want to take a small bag with them so they can brush their teeth after every meal or sugary meals, or apply deodorant as needed. Going to bed around the same time each night will help keep hormone levels regulated, reducing the risk of excessive sweating and perspiration odor.

Athlete-Specific Tips

Personal Hygiene in Teenagers
After sports or excessive physical activity, teens who keep the body dry, fresh and clean will look and feel better. Photo Credit Ezra Shaw/Digital Vision/Getty Images

Many teens are physically active. This means that they may have to shower more than once a day. After sports or excessive physical activity, teens who keep the body dry, fresh and clean will look and feel better. Make sure that girls who have started their menstrual cycles have a consistent supply of feminine hygiene products, such as tampons, panty liners and maxi pads, to promote cleanliness and confidence.

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