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How to Calculate Ovulation After Miscarriage

by
author image Lillian Downey
A Jill-of-all-trades, Lillian Downey is a certified Responsible Sexuality Educator, certified clinical phlebotomist and a certified non-profit administrator. She's also written extensively on gardening and cooking. She also authors blogs on nail art blog and women's self esteem.
How to Calculate Ovulation After Miscarriage
Many couples look for ovulation after a miscarriage to try to conceive again. Photo Credit couple image by Sophie Hurel from Fotolia.com

Miscarriage is as emotionally taxing as it physically. You might need time to heal, and therefore want to avoid another pregnancy, or you might be eager to try to conceive again. Because your cycle needs time to regulate after a miscarriage, it can be difficult to pinpoint when you being to ovulate, but there are several different methods available. You can use one method independently or use all of them to paint a more complete picture of your cycle.

Step 1

Circle the first day of your first regular menstrual cycle on your calender. If you are bleeding irregularly, circle each day that you experience bleeding or spotting while you wait for your normal cycle to return. An accurate cycle record helps you know when you will ovulate. When your normal cycle will return depends on the circumstances of your miscarriage and any complications associated with it.

Step 2

Take your temperature each morning before you get out of bed with a basal body thermometer. Write this number down on your cycle record calendar. According to Baby Hopes, ovulation can occur as soon as two weeks after a miscarriage. During ovulation, your basal body temperature rises in a pattern you can track. This method might not be accurate if you had a fever or infection as a result of your miscarriage.

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Step 3

Write down what your cervical mucous looks like each day. Your cervical mucous cycle goes along with your normal menstrual cycle, so once you've begun having regular periods, you can rely on your cervical mucous to signal ovulation. Look for mucous that's clear, watery and stretchy, like an egg white. This is the fertile mucous that accompanies ovulation.

Step 4

Go to the doctor to have your HCG (pregnancy hormone) level checked. According to Baby Hopes, your cycles won't return to normal until your HCG levels zero out because HCG blocks production of hormones that cause ovulation. This usually takes about two weeks, but it can take longer. If you're eager for your cycles to return and they haven't, having this level monitored can help you better plan fertility in the immediate future.

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