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Which States Have No Fault Divorce?

A "no-fault" divorce is any divorce in which the spouse asking for divorce does not have to prove that the other spouse did anything wrong. Often, it is enough simply to state that the parties cannot successfully get along anymore. Most U.S. states offer no-fault divorce, but a few require a period of separation before a no-fault divorce will be granted.
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Why Brad and Angelina May Be Part of the Seasonal Divorce Spike

Hollywood royalty Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have split after two years of marriage, citing “irreconcilable differences.” Th...
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Joint Tenant Vs. Tenants in Common

A joint tenancy and a tenancy in common are both legal arrangements that allow two or more people to share ownership of property. However, the legal relationship between joint tenants and tenants in common differs, and different rules apply when one tenant leaves or dies.
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What Does the Law Say About the Father's Rights on Abortion?

Abortion is one of the most controversial issues in American politics. The appropriate role that the father has in the abortion decision, if any, is just one of many heated debates on the topic. Though in some cultures throughout history, and even in 2010, men have a significant or even dominant role in abortion decisions, American father’s have essentially no legal right. The context in which this concern has been most litigated in the U.S. is with regard to the rights of married men whose wives seek to have an abortion.
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How Does My Child's Father Sign Over His Rights?

The laws of all states include provisions that permit a birth father to voluntarily sign over his parental rights in very specific circumstances. Applicable statutes dictate both the circumstances in which a surrender of parental rights is permissible as well as the procedures that must be used to accomplish that objective, according to Adoption.org.
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Adultery Laws in Kansas

Divorce laws in Kansas are codified in Kansas Statutes Annotated, Chapter 60, Title 16. These laws set forth the limited situations in which the issue of adultery appropriately can be raised in a marriage dissolution case. In addition, criminal adultery is described in Kansas Statutes Annotated Chapter 21, Section 3507.
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Adultery & Divorce in Georgia

Georgia divorce law recognizes 13 reasons for divorce, including "irretrievably broken," a no-fault ground, and 12 at-fault grounds for divorce, including adultery. Using adultery as a grounds for divorce may have implications for both parties regarding child custody, alimony and division of marital assets. Proving adultery is difficult and significantly increases divorce expenses.
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The Best Custody Arrangements for Children

Establishing the best custody arrangements for a child must be accomplished on a case by cases basis, according to the American Bar Association Section of Family Law. What is ideal for a child -- and parents -- in one case may be inappropriate in another situation. All state laws recognize a variety of options when determining custody arrangements for a child. These statutes permit parents to attempt to negotiate and agree to an appropriate custody arrangement. Failing to reach such an agreement, the court establishes a custody scheme the judge deems most appropriate.
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What Happens After Filing for Divorce?

When one spouse files for divorce, it kicks off a legal back-and-forth that may remind you of how a lawsuit progresses. That's because a divorce filing is, in fact, a lawsuit. One spouse is suing the other for divorce, as well as for certain property and, if there are children, specific custody arrangements. The initial filing is called the "petition" or "complaint." The next move is up to the other spouse.
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Rights for Separated Fathers

While each state establishes specific laws regarding the rights of parents, the general principle in American law today is that the biological parents of a child have almost incontrovertible rights. A father has rights to his child even when he is separated from his wife, and few courts will be willing to abridge those rights except when the child’s welfare may be in question.
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