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5 Things You Need to Know About Proximal Humerus Fractures

by
Albert Chong, M.D.
Albert Chong, M.D. is freelance writer and board-certified, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and arthroscopy. He focuses on tendon repairs, ligament reconstructions, cartilage transplants and joint replacements.

The proximal humerus is the part of the arm bone which forms the shoulder joint. In 1934, Codman described these parts: head, shaft, greater tuberosity and lesser tuberosity. The Neer classification system helps to guide treatment of these fractures. To qualify as a separate part, a piece must either be displaced 1 cm or be angulated 45 degrees from its normal position. Thus, there are two-part, three-part and four-part proximal humerus fractures. One-part fractures are essentially non-displaced fractures.

The proximal humerus is the part of the arm bone which forms the shoulder joint. In 1934, Codman described these parts: head, shaft, greater tuberosity and lesser tuberosity. The Neer classification system helps to guide treatment of these fractures. To qualify as a separate part, a piece must either be displaced 1 cm or be angulated 45 degrees from its normal position. Thus, there are two-part, three-part and four-part proximal humerus fractures. One-part fractures are essentially non-displaced fractures.

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