How to Hold Two Full Time Jobs at the Same Time

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A woman is standing behind a bakery counter. (Image: Wavebreakmedia/iStock/Getty Images)

Holding down two full-time jobs at the same time can be difficult and even dangerous. When you aren't able to get any personal time or have the proper rest that you need, you may make mistakes on the job that can put you in a precarious position. But with careful planning, scheduling and flexibility, you can keep two full-time jobs in order to make ends meet. You won't have much personal time, but it may be the short-term solution that helps you and your family weather a financial storm.

Step 1

Create a solid and consistent schedule that is easy for you to follow, suggests Employment Spot. Your different shifts and responsibilities at work will likely dictate your work schedules, but you may find it necessary to schedule sleep, appointments, family time and personal time as well. You'll only have a few hours for yourself each day, so make sure you don't over schedule. Say "no" when you can't do something and reschedule for a time when you aren't so busy.

Step 2

Separate your two jobs so they never overlap. You could jeopardize both jobs if you complete work from one job in the workplace of another. Keep them completely contained, and choose jobs with little in the way of take-home work. When you leave, leave your work at the office so you aren't tempted to continue working on projects at your other full-time job. Make sure that working two full-time jobs doesn't affect you performance at work, warns David Weliver, owner of Money Under 30.

Step 3

Ask each of your supervisors about the possibility of flexible scheduling, working at home, or working during your off-hours. Instead of taking on two traditional eight-hour shifts each day, ask if you can do some work at home, or work longer hours but on fewer days. Many employers are open to the idea of flexible scheduling, since it typically saves them money on energy costs. Create a few different scenarios and present them to your supervisor as some possibilities that would give you more leeway in your schedule.

Step 4

Negotiate a piece-rate based on performance, rather than being paid hourly. Talk to your supervisor about only being paid for the work that you do. You might find yourself stuck at work with little to do, wishing you could work on a project for your other job. CNN.com contributor and owner of HR.com, Debbie McGrath recommends that you ask your boss about the possibility of doing work for your other company at his office. If your pay is based on performance and piece rather than an hourly wage, you may be able to work out an understanding that allows you to work both jobs at once.

Step 5

Stop working both jobs when you can. Not having a personal and social life and living on work and sleep alone could cause you to feel dissatisfied and depressed. Balance your finances or look for one job that will net you the same salary as two full-time jobs to relieve some of the pressure on your schedule.

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