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How to Keep Gas Out of Babies Stomach

author image Lillian Downey
A Jill-of-all-trades, Lillian Downey is a certified Responsible Sexuality Educator, certified clinical phlebotomist and a certified non-profit administrator. She's also written extensively on gardening and cooking. She also authors blogs on nail art blog and women's self esteem.
How to Keep Gas Out of Babies Stomach
Close-up of a father bottle feeding his child. Photo Credit Purestock/Purestock/Getty Images

When your little one has gas, he might have trouble sleeping or he might fuss and cry as the pain and pressure make him uncomfortable. Most babies suck in air as they drink, including breast-fed babies, according to the website Healthy Children. While you might not be able to keep all the air out of your baby's stomach, you can adjust your feeding and burping techniques to keep that gas to a minimum and relieve it quickly.

Step 1

Choose a baby bottle with a special anti-gas airflow design or with a special air reduction mechanism inside. Such bottles are designed to limit the amount of air that the baby can swallow, which should reduce gas. Prevent the milk from flowing too quickly from the nipple so your baby won't have to suck the milk at a faster rate.

Step 2

Work to create a tight latch if you're breast-feeding. A good latch is important because it allows your baby to get enough milk and prevents your baby from sucking in air instead of milk. If you're unable to perfect your latch or if your breastfed baby is especially gassy, set up an appointment with a lactation consultant.

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Step 3

Burp your bottle-fed baby after every 2 to 3 oz., according to Healthy Children. Burp your breast-fed baby after leaving one breast and before switching to another. Burping frequently prevents gas from building up in your baby's stomach.

Step 4

Fed and burp your baby in an upright position, according to the website Ask Dr. Sears. Laying your child on his back while you feed can cause your child to trap gas in his stomach. Upright burping also helps expel gas faster when it does make it to the stomach.

Step 5

Take the bottle away from your baby as soon as it's almost empty. When a baby sucks on a empty bottle, he sucks gas into his stomach.

Step 6

Avoid feeding your baby if he is fussy. Healthy Children points out that fussy babies suck more air into their stomachs during feedings.

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