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Skin Problems From Pedicures

by
author image Lindsay Tadlock
Lindsay Tadlock began writing in 2010. She has worked as a personal trainer for over three years and shares her fitness and nutrition knowledge in her writings. She graduated from Texas A&M University in 2000 with her Bachelor of Arts in finance and worked for seven years as a commercial lender.
Skin Problems From Pedicures
You should question your salon regarding the type of disinfectants they use. Photo Credit Matthew Wakem/Digital Vision/Getty Images

Pedicures can make you feel pampered and confident in less than 30 minutes, but skin problems from pedicures are not unheard of. Some major bacterial breakouts have resulted from salon pedicures, attracting the attention of health agencies across the United States. Because personal hygiene may not be maintained in a professional salon because of the large number of clients they cater to, it is possible that bacterial or fungal foot problems can occur.

Hygiene

One of the problems while getting a pedicure from a professional salon is the level of hygiene maintained in the facility. While some salons maintain very high standards of hygiene, others may not. In such a case, it becomes your responsibility to check whether the salon uses disinfected soak vessels. Also, ensure that the person doing your pedicure has washed her hands before starting.

Problems

While regular pedicures are the ideal solution for taking care of cracked heels and calluses, problems resulting from pedicures can cause bacterial and fungal infections. As reported on website Nurse Week, the largest bacterial outbreak took place in California in the year 2000, when four patients reported boils on their legs. The link between these women was the salon they visited for their monthly pedicures. 110 customers of the salon's were treated for bacterial infections in that year because the foot baths were rarely cleaned, providing the perfect conditions for bacteria to grow and infect customers.

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Symptoms

Usually, pedicure infections from different bacterial strains have the same symptoms. These include small boils on the lower legs, which may or may not be accompanied by fever or rashes. If left untreated, these boils can fill with pus and may turn into painful sores. People with poor immune systems are more prone to such infections, which may cause the boils to spread to other parts of the body. According to website Pedicures and Foot Care, some bacterial infections have resulted in death, especially for conditions in which antibiotics were ineffective.

Precautions

Do not get a pedicure if you have just shaved, waxed or bleached your legs. It is also recommended that you avoid a pedicure if you have a corn or something that could get infected. If you are unsure about the foot bath's hygiene, ask the salon about the disinfectant they use. Do not get a pedicure in a salon where water is re-circulated in the foot bath after each pedicure, which can increase the chances of getting an infection.

Considerations

If you have recently had a pedicure and notice any cut or infection on your feet or lower legs, you should contact your doctor immediately. He may prescribe an antibiotic to fight off an infection. After getting a pedicure, it is a good idea to wash your feet with an antibacterial soap when you get home to rid your feet of any possible bacteria from the salon.

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References

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