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Hair Loss Due to an Oily Scalp

by
author image Nicole Adams
Nicole Adams is an accomplished writer, publishing in print and online. She has submitted hundreds of articles for websites, including CBS Local and Education.com. Adams earned a Bachelor of Science in psychology with concentrated studies in health and nutrition, and animal behavior and nutrition. She loves to cook and volunteers in animal rescue.
Hair Loss Due to an Oily Scalp
An oily scalp can lead to dandruff, which can cause hair loss. Photo Credit BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images

Hair loss affects thousands of men and women. There can be many causes of hair loss with differing degrees of severity. The state of your scalp can make a big difference in the health of your hair. An oily scalp can lead to dandruff but can be treated with the possibility of preventing hair loss.

Hair Loss

Your hair goes through a three-phase growing cycle, according to the Dermatology Online Journal. Hair loss can occur when this cycle is interrupted. The first part of the phase is called anagen, the active growing part of the cycle that usually lasts from two to six years. The second part of the phase is called catagen. This phase is short and when your hair becomes protein. The last part of the growing cycle is telogen. During this phase, your hair falls out and the hair follicle re-enters the first phase. If your hair follicle fails to re-enter the first phase, your hair follicle becomes inactive and you gradually lose your hair.

Oily Scalp

An oily scalp can be caused by overactive sebaceous glands on the scalp that can lead to excessively shiny hair. The oil attracts dirt more easily, can make your hair stick together and produces dandruff. An oily scalp can be triggered by a hormonal imbalance, as found during puberty, pregnancy or menopause, according to the Short Hair Style website. An excess buildup of oil on the scalp can lead to dandruff. Conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis, scalp psoriasis and malassezia affect the oil glands and create dandruff.

Significance

An oily scalp can lead to hair loss because of the resulting dandruff, according to the Surviving Hair Loss website. Severe cases that are left untreated block the hair follicles, inhibiting the natural growth cycle. Seborrheic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin and scalp from an excess buildup of oil. It causes your scalp to be flaky, itchy, red and irritated. Scalp psoriasis is also an inflammation of the skin and scalp. It's characterized as an overproduction of skin cells. Scalp psoriasis causes flaking, itchiness, redness, irritation, scales and plaques. The plaques can suffocate your hair follicles, rendering them inactive, according to the Surviving Hair Loss website. Malassezia is a fungus that resides naturally on the scalp, feeding off the oils and dead skin -- but when it gets out of control, the overabundance of fungus can also block hair follicles, resulting in hair loss from inactive follicles.

Treatment

There are a variety of shampoos for treating oily scalp, dandruff and hair loss. Shampoos that contain ketoconazole or selenium sulfide help fight the infections that cause seborrheic dermatitis and malassezia, which can lead to hair loss, according to the Surviving Hair Loss website. Coal tar slows the production of skin cells, helping reduce inflammation, redness and irritation, treating scalp psoriasis. Shampoos that have salicylic acid peel away the outer layer of skin cells to treat scalp psoriasis. Organic and natural shampoos can also help for hair loss. Herbs such as rosemary, chamomile, thyme, lavender, aloe vera, jojoba, jasmine and pomegranate, found in organic shampoos, are gentle, safe and effective.

Considerations

If you believe you're suffering from hair loss, contact your doctor to find the best treatment for your oily scalp. Certain illnesses or medications may be causing your oily scalp and hair loss. Inadequate nutrition, diets lacking in B vitamins, zinc or good fats can lead to hair loss.

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