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The 11 Day Diet

by
author image Brigid Rauch
Based in Bethesda, Md., Brigid Rauch has been writing about health and nutrition since 2007. Her work has appeared on websites for companies like Honest Tea. Rauch holds a master's degree in urban planning from University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a registered yoga teacher with Yoga Alliance and teaches classes in Ayurvedic holistic medicine for moms and pregnant women.
The 11 Day Diet
Deli sandwiches on a plate with lunch meat, lettuce and tomato. Photo Credit Joel Albrizio/iStock/Getty Images

The 11-day diet is an example of a fad diet that promises rapid weight loss without permanent dietary changes or exercise. These types of diets may not result in long-term weight loss and may be unhealthy. A diet that incorporates sustainable changes in food consumption and exercise may be more effective in the long run. Talk to your doctor before making any dietary changes.

Calorie Shifting

According to the website ultimatefatburner.com, the 11-day diet, also called Fat Loss 4 Idiots, consists of a program that creates menus that you can buy at the website. The vendor claims that the diet utilizes the concept of calorie shifting -- consuming varied amounts of calories on different days -- to make your body go into starvation mode and burn stored fat.

Review

According to a review of the 11-day diet by dietsthatsucceed.com, the 11-day diet may successfully help users to drop about 9 pounds over the 11 days. The diet incorporates the concept of calorie shifting and combines specific foods in ways that may help burn fat and calories. The only exercise recommended on the diet is a 30-minute walk every day. The review states that the diet consists of eating the same foods over and over again and is a low-calorie diet. So, in the opinion of the reviewer, it is not a sustainable diet plan but may help with quick weight loss.

Healthy Weight Loss

The best way to lose weight is through permanent and sustainable changes in diet and exercise. A diet that promises rapid weight gain may be unhealthy. MayoClinic.com advises losing 6 to 10 pounds in the first two weeks and 1 or 2 pounds per week after that.

Fad Diets

Fad diets — including diets that that promise rapid weight loss, like the 11 day diet, or advise eating only one type of food — may help you lose weight initially. However, they do not provide a balanced diet, so you may not be able to stay on them for very long and will find it difficult to keep the weight off after ending the diet. Diets that severely restrict calories may be dangerous. Do not attempt fad diets or any dietary changes without talking to your doctor.

Healthy Alternative

The Mayo Clinic diet is an example of a healthy and sustainable alternative to fad diets like the 11-day diet. The Mayo Clinic diet recommends consuming lots of fruits and vegetables -- which provide a high level of nutrition without a lot of calories, along whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy and healthy fats. It advises incorporating regular exercise into your daily activity.

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