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How Does Valium Affect Liver Enzymes?

by
author image Shelly Morgan
Shelly Morgan has been writing and editing for over 25 years for various medical and scientific publications. Although she began her professional career in pharmacological research, Morgan turned to patent law where she specialized in prosecuting patents for medical devices. She also writes about renal disease and hypertension for several nonprofits aimed at educating and supporting kidney patients.
How Does Valium Affect Liver Enzymes?
Although most drugs are metabolized by the liver, some drugs are metabolized by the kidneys. Photo Credit Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Getty Images

Knowing how commonly used drugs affect different systems in the body helps you make choices regarding your health. Liver enzymes are affected by most drugs, including Valium. This is not as negative as it sounds because if these enzymes were not affected, it would be impossible for your body to get rid of Valium.

Definitions

Valium used to be a brand name for diazepam. Diazepam is used to treat anxiety, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and muscle disorders. Occasionally, doctors give this drug to patients to calm them before procedures such as endoscopy.

The liver is a large internal organ in the body. In addition to storing glycogen, the liver makes enzymes used in digestion. It produces bile, synthesizes proteins, produces factors that clot blood and helps break down drugs.

Diazepam Metabolism

Diazepam is metabolized in the liver. The 1998 issue of "American Family Physician" says that the point of drug metabolism “is to make drugs more water soluble” so they can be excreted. Cytochrome P450 enzymes work together, making specific alternations to a drug. Although small amounts of these enzymes are found in the intestines, lungs and other organs, they are primarily found in the liver.

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Specific Reactions

Cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver break down diazepam by many chemical processes. The drug is demethylated and hydroxylated. Demethylation involves the removal of a methyl group, consisting of one carbon and three hydrogen atoms. Hydroxylation involves the addition of a hydroxyl group consisting of an oxygen atom bonded to a hydrogen atom. Glucuronidation, or the addition of glucuronic acid, also takes place.

Warning

Diazepam is not recommended for patients with liver disease who may be less able to metabolize the drug. These patients may suffer from additional liver disease or drug toxicity if they take drugs that their bodies cannot effectively excrete. If you have liver disease, take only those drugs that your doctor has recommended.

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References

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