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Cranberry Juice and Water Diet

author image Stephanie Lee
Stephanie Lee began writing in 2000 with concentration on food, travel, fashion and real estate. She has written for Amnesty International and maintains three blogs. Lee holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations from the University of California, Irvine, and an M.B.A. from Concordia University.
Cranberry Juice and Water Diet
An empty glass on an outdoor table. Photo Credit bakerjarvis/iStock/Getty Images

The cranberry water diet, otherwise known as The Fat Flush Plan, was developed by Dr. Ann Louise Gittleman, M.S., CNS, Ph.D. While the cranberry water diet is famed as being both a weight-loss program and detox plan, the Quick Care website points out that most of the weight lost is, in fact, water weight and should not be considered a permanent weight loss. It is recommended you speak with your medical adviser before embarking on this program.


Dr. Ann Louise Gittleman, M.S., CNS, Ph.D., created this program based on the theory that excess weight is related to the level of toxicity in the liver, water retention, an overabundance of insulin as well as stress. According to Quick Care, a detox plan may prove effective in weight loss because it removes the toxic elements your body would naturally receive from processed foods. This, in turn, provides your liver with a resting period and prevents a buildup of toxins.

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While many juice-based detox programs require a period of fasting, the cranberry juice diet begins with a two-week cleansing phase in which calories are restricted and dairy, wheat and sugar food products are prohibited. Encouraged are proteins, a minimum of 8 oz., in addition to two eggs each day, vegetables, flaxseed oil and spices that are considered thermogenic, or heat-producing. You are required to consume a total of eight glasses of diluted unsweetened cranberry juice each day, both prior to each meal and in between meals, but never during meals. The diuretic beverage is one part juice to four parts water.


The program instructs its participants to consume daily supplements such as GLA, powdered psyllium husk and flaxseed. GLA, or gamma-linolenic acid, may be found in black currant seed oil and is known to boost weight loss and regulate the body's sodium levels. One of the eight required daily glasses of cranberry water should include either 1 tsp. of powdered psyllium husk or 1 tbsp. of flaxseed. Both are rich in fiber nutrients and, according to the U.S. National Institute of Health, also may help reduce cholesterol levels.


Additional guidelines include sleeping precisely eight hours each night and participating in 20 to 40 minutes of physical activity each day. Although many followers of the cranberry water diet have had success with the program, it is essentially a low-calorie, high-protein diet with a healthy dose of physical activity. According to Katherine Zaratsky, of Mayo Clinic, the introduction of outside substances are unnecessary to detox the body's internal organs. The detox process occurs naturally via the kidneys and liver while the remaining toxins exit the body through urine and stool. The bottom line is, with or without cranberry water, if you fuel your body with nutritious foods, restrict calories and follow a fitness program, the weight will undoubtedly drop.

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