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How Much Potassium Is in Light Salt?

author image Lexa W. Lee
Lexa W. Lee is a New Orleans-based writer with more than 20 years of experience. She has contributed to "Central Nervous System News" and the "Journal of Naturopathic Medicine," as well as several online publications. Lee holds a Bachelor of Science in biology from Reed College, a naturopathic medical degree from the National College of Naturopathic Medicine and served as a postdoctoral researcher in immunology.

Lite Salt is a trademarked salt alternative that has a lighter or smaller sodium content than regular salt. It contains a blend of regular salt and potassium chloride, according to Morton Salt. Lite Salt may be suitable for you if you have blood pressure conditions associated with a number of chronic health problems, according to the University of Wisconsin.


A reduced sodium product like Lite Salt may be useful because sodium is known to exacerbate elevated blood pressure that is associated with heart disease, kidney disease, liver failure, a history of long term steroid use, Eating over 2,400 milligrams a day may cause your blood pressure to rise. This figure includes the sodium content of your food as well as sodium-containing seasonings you may add. Excess sodium may cause you to retain more water and interfere with your medications.

Potassium Content

A quarter teaspoon of Morton's Lite Salt contains 360 milligrams of potassium and 300 milligrams of sodium, compared to no potassium and 575 mg of sodium in regular table salt. Both potassium and sodium are important electrolytes in your body. Their concentrations are closely regulated inside and outside of your cells because they enable electricity to flow across cell membranes, making possible heart, nerve and muscle activity, according to the Linus Pauling Institute.

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Lite Salt may not be suitable for you if you are suffering from problems that prevent your body from eliminating excess potassium in your urine. These problems include acute or chronic kidney failure, tissue damage from serious burns and trauma, rupture of red blood cells, and the use of drugs like potassium-conserving diuretics, anticoagulants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. You should also avoid Lite Salt if you have excessively high blood levels of aldosterone, an adrenal hormone that decreases the urinary excretion of potassium.

Side Effects

Healthy individuals are able to safely eliminate excess potassium. Side effects associated with potassium supplements, such as abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, are are mostly associated with potassium chloride tablets. If you are using Lite Salt because of blood pressure problems, you should also check food labels for sodium content. Processed foods often contain added sodium. and consult your doctor if you have questions concerning the use of salt substitutes.

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