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Nutrition in Half of a Roasted Chicken

by
author image Natalie Stein
Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University.
Nutrition in Half of a Roasted Chicken
Roasted chicken is a nutritious menu choice. Photo Credit Liv Friis-Larsen/iStock/Getty Images

Roasted chicken is a lower-fat alternative to fried chicken or higher-fat meats, such as spareribs. You might be able to order a half of a roasted chicken at a fast-food or casual sit-down restaurant, or you can roast a small chicken and share it with your spouse for a satisfying home-cooked meal. Roasted chicken is a nutritious choice as long as you monitor your portion size.

Calories and Macronutrients

After removing the bone, a half of a roasted chicken weighs 480 grams, or 17 ounces. It has 1,070 calories, 115 grams of protein, 64 grams of fat and 0 grams of carbohydrates. The nutritional values for a half of a roasted chicken depend on the size of the chicken. A half of a Cornish game hen, for example, weighs only 129 grams, or less than 5 ounces, and provides 334 calories, 29 grams of protein and 23 grams of fat.

Saturated Fat

A half of a large roasted chicken has 18 grams of saturated fat. Saturated fat may increase your risk for heart disease because it raises levels of cholesterol in your blood, according to the MedlinePlus. Recommendations for healthy adults are to limit intake of saturated fat to no more than 7 to 10 percent of total calories, or no more than 15 to 22 grams of saturated fat per day on a 2,000-calorie diet. You can reduce the saturated fat in roasted chicken by discarding the skin.

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Cholesterol

A half of a roasted chicken has 365 milligrams of cholesterol, or 122 percent of the daily value. Cholesterol from your diet raises levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol in your blood, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Cholesterol is only in animal products, such as fatty meats, seafood, butter, dairy products, egg yolks and dark-meat poultry with skin. Plant-based foods do not contain cholesterol.

Other Nutrients

A half of a chicken has 398 international units of vitamin A, or 8 percent of the daily value, 6 milligrams of iron, or 33 percent of the daily value, and 7 milligrams of zinc, or 47 percent of the daily value. Half of a chicken contains 1,013 milligrams of potassium and 350 milligrams of sodium. A diet to maintain normal blood pressure should include at least 4,700 milligrams of potassium and no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines. High-sodium seasonings, such as salty spice rubs, add extra sodium to chicken.

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References

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