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The Paleo Diet Vs. the China Study

by
author image Sara Ipatenco
Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.
The Paleo Diet Vs. the China Study
A man is talking to a nutritionist. Photo Credit KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock/Getty Images

The Paleo Diet and the China Study have each convinced scores of people that eating a certain way will aid in weight loss and decrease the risk of health problems such as heart disease. The two diets, however, disagree on what foods should be included in a healthy diet and which should be restricted or avoided. Speak to your doctor about the healthiest diet for you.

Meat and Dairy

The creator of the Paleo Diet, Loren Cordain, suggested that humans need to eat foods available during the time of ancient ancestors, which means a good dose of meat, poultry and fish, including turkey, lean beef, lamb, halibut, salmon, shrimp and crab each day. The diet puts dairy -- milk, cheese and yogurt -- off-limits. The China Study suggests that a plant-based diet is better for overall health and restricts meat and dairy.

Rules for Grains

Grains such as bread, pasta, rice, couscous and quinoa are off the Paleo table, which can cause problems because it's difficult to eliminate grains from your diet. The China Study pushes whole grain bread, rolled oats, brown rice, quinoa and whole-wheat pasta.

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Fruits and Vegetables

Both the Paleo Diet and the China Study recommend eating plenty of fruits and vegetables. Bananas, berries, apples, peaches, pineapple, avocado, tomatoes, leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower and pumpkin are a few options for either diet. The exception is potatoes, which are permitted on the China Study Diet, but are off-limits on the Paleo Diet.

Diet in Your Lifestyle

Both diets claim to reduce the risk of certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes, and both claim to aid in weight loss and weight management. While this can be true for either diet, always speak with your doctor to determine which eating plan is right for you based on your current health.

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References

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