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Modified Atkins Diet

by
author image Jessica Bruso
Based in Massachusetts, Jessica Bruso has been writing since 2008. She holds a master of science degree in food policy and applied nutrition and a bachelor of arts degree in international relations, both from Tufts University.
Modified Atkins Diet
A sliced avocado on a cutting board. Photo Credit oxyzay/iStock/Getty Images

The modified Atkins diet is sometimes prescribed to help treat epilepsy, especially in cases in which people don't respond well to the medications available. This diet can result in up to a 90 percent reduction in seizures in some patients, according to an article published in "Epilepsia" in November 2008. It is similar to a ketogenic diet, which is used for the same purpose, but patients are more likely to stick with it, notes a May 2012 article published in "Seizure."

The Basics

In the modified Atkins diet, people can only have 10 to 30 grams of carbohydrates per day, but can eat unlimited amounts of fat, protein and liquids. People who follow this diet need to take vitamin supplements because of its restrictive nature. Potential adverse effects include poor growth, gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, acidosis and kidney stones.

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