zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

Nutritional Values of Shellfish

by
author image Kara McEvoy
Based in Austin, Texas, Kara McEvoy has been writing professionally since 2007. She worked for three years as a public health nutritionist with the Vermont Department of Health, where she wrote nutrition-related articles for "The St. Albans Messenger." McEvoy holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition and food science from the University of Vermont.
Nutritional Values of Shellfish
A young couple enjoy sitting down to a shellfish meal including lobster. Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

Shellfish is a broad term for marine animals that have a hard outer shell. Shellfish are often low in fat, high in protein and are classified as either crustaceans or mollusks. Lobster, shrimp and crabs are crustaceans, meaning they have a jointed, crust-like exoskeleton. Oysters and clams are types of mollusks, and are soft bodied and covered by a shell. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. of lobster has 76 calories, 3 oz. of shrimp has 101 calories and 3 oz. of oysters has 87 calories.

Protein

The Institute of Medicine recommends men consume 56g of protein daily and women 46g. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. of lobster has 16.15g of protein, 3 oz. of oysters has 9.71g of protein and 3 oz. of shrimp has 19.36g of protein. Protein is necessary in your diet to support growth, repair and maintenance of tissues.

Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is a water-soluble vitamin necessary for health of nerve cells and red blood cells. The Institute of Medicine recommends adults consume 2.4mcg of vitamin B-12 daily. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. of lobster has 1.22mcg of vitamin B-12 while 3 oz. of shrimp and oyster have 1.41 and 14.88mcg, respectively.

You Might Also Like

Zinc

Shellfish are a good source of zinc, a mineral essential for growth and development, energy metabolism and immune function. The Institute of Medicine recommends men consume 11mg of zinc daily and women consume 8mg. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. of lobster has 3.44mg of zinc, 3 oz. of shrimp has 1.39mg of zinc and 3 oz. of oysters has 66.81mg of zinc. Both oysters and shrimp are high in the mineral selenium as well.

Choline

While choline is an essential nutrient, it is not by definition a vitamin. Your body can synthesize small amounts of choline, but to maintain health, choline must come from the diet. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. each of lobster, shrimp and oysters have 68.8mg, 115.1mg and 110mg of choline respectively. The Institute of Medicine recommends 425mg daily for women and 550mg for men. You need choline for cell membrane structure, cell signaling, fat transport and nerve transmission.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is necessary for the synthesis of steroid hormones and bile. The Institute of Medicine recommends limiting dietary cholesterol because your body can make its own and because high blood cholesterol levels increases your risk of heart disease. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, 3 oz. of lobster, shrimp and oysters have 124mg, 179mg and 64mg of cholesterol, respectively.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media