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What Is H.E.M. Ankle Rehab?

by
author image William Lynch
William Lynch has been a freelance writer for the past fifteen years, working for various web sites and publications. He is currently enrolled in a Master of Arts program in writing popular fiction at Seton Hill University. He hopes to one day become a mystery novelist.
What Is H.E.M. Ankle Rehab?
Therapist manipulating a patient's foot and ankle Photo Credit Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Getty Images

A sprained ankle is one of the most common sports injuries -- and it can be frustrating to heal, often requiring several weeks of rest and inactivity before returning to the playing field. The H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System attempts to drastically reduce that healing time, using techniques far beyond the traditional RICE method of rest, ice, compression and elevation to speed recovery.

Function

The H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System claims to be a complete ankle rehabilitation program, offering techniques to heal the injured ankle and protocols to strengthen your ankle to prevent future injuries. Users may follow the H.E.M. system to heal a fresh sprain, rehabilitate an old injury or strengthen weak ankles.

Features

The H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System features a combination of hydrotherapy, exercise and massage to accelerate the healing process. The hydrotherapy helps reduce swelling and increase blood flow to the injured ankle. By introducing exercise and massage, the H.E.M. system attempts to break down scar tissue and maintain flexibility. As a result, the ankle ligaments remain loose and prevent any stiffness from taking hold, resulting in improved strength and shorter recovery times. Some common H.E.M. exercises designed to strengthen weak ankles include performing square sprints, in which you run forward, sideways and backward in a square shape to improve lateral agility -- square broad jumps, which involves jumping forward, sideways and backward -- and simple one-legged balancing exercises to trigger the tiny muscles of the foot and ankle.

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Benefits

H.E.M. ankle rehab promises to have most injured individuals walking without pain in as little as three to seven days, which is much sooner than the four to eight weeks of recovery time associated with traditional sprained ankle treatments. The H.E.M. system requires no additional equipment and can be performed in the comfort of your home in only a few minutes each day. If followed properly, the H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System claims to increase ankle strength, heal neuromuscular damage, reduce scar tissue and greatly limit the chances of a future injury. The program may also result in improved speed, agility and lateral movement, translating to enhanced athletic performance.

Considerations

Before undertaking the H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System, you should confirm the exact nature of your ankle injury. Many ankle fractures may feel like simple sprains at first, yet the pain will only intensify with time. The H.E.M. system should not be started until the ankle fracture has been allowed to heal completely.

History

Scott Malin, a National Academy of Sports Medicine-certified strength and conditioning coach, invented the H.E.M. Ankle Rehab System after working for years with clients to find new ways to treat stubborn sprained ankles. Malin found the traditional RICE methodology to be effective for only the first two days of treatment, leaving ankles bruised and swollen without any real healing strategy. Malin’s frustrations inspired him to devise the H.E.M. system, which he markets online as a downloadable electronic book. Malin offers a 30-day, money-back guarantee to support his work.

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References

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