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Home Remedies With Vinegar for High Blood Pressure

by
author image Amber Ham
Amber Ham is an organic agriculture and health and wellness specialist. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Central Oklahoma. Her research has been featured in numerous trade publications and her expertise extends to crafting and living on a budget. Ham has served as a health educator for the state of Oklahoma and currently oversees organic practices on her family-owned farm.
Home Remedies With Vinegar for High Blood Pressure
Personal blood pressure cuffs can help you monitor your blood pressure at home. Photo Credit BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images

With so many proven uses, from cleaning the bathroom sink to creating a gourmet meal, vinegar may also be used as a home remedy for high blood pressure. For centuries, the Amish community has relied on the medicinal value of this bitter concoction to treat and prevent a number of ailments across the lifespan, including high blood pressure and overall heart health. As with trying any home remedy, you should consult your physician first.

Symptoms of High Blood Pressure

According to The Mayo Clinic, some people with high blood pressure do not exhibit any signs or symptoms, although their blood pressure may reach dangerously high levels. Some people with high blood pressure complain of dizziness, a dull headache and frequent nosebleeds. Typically, your doctor will check your blood pressure, even if you do not complain of any symptoms. If you do not see a doctor regularly, you can check your own blood pressure at most pharmacies, or you can purchase a blood pressure cuff to monitor your blood pressure at home. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should consult your physician before trying a home remedy.

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Vinegar Remedies

To make your own vinegar home remedy for high blood pressure, mix one tablespoon of honey with three teaspoons of vinegar in 8 oz. of warm water and drink the mixture about 10 minutes before breakfast. Additionally, you can mix 2 tbsp. of cider vinegar with 1 tsp. of honey in 8 oz. of warm or hot water and drink it 10 minutes before bedtime. While consuming vinegar alone may help to reduce high blood pressure, avoiding foods high in cholesterol like eggs, bacon, ham, butter, cheese, ice cream and chocolate, and exercising at least 30 minutes three times a week will increase the effectiveness of vinegar and lend to a healthier lifestyle.

Supplements

Members of the Amish community generally do not use traditional medicine. They often opt for supplements to promote heart health, diminishing the need to resort to other remedies, like vinegar, later on. Among supplements that they recommend to promote heart health and healthy blood pressure are vitamin E, vitamin C and lecithin. Eating whole wheat bread daily can substantially increase vitamin E intake. Dr. Patrick Quillin notes that in a study of thousands of people, researchers found that the most important nutritional predictor of heart disease was the amount of vitamin E in the blood. Because vitamin E aids in the prevention of blocked arteries, it can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease.

Risks

High blood pressure can be an indicator for more serious health problems, including kidney problems, adrenal gland tumors, and congenital defects in your blood vessels. Age, race, family history, weight, physical activity, sodium intake, use of tobacco and alcohol, stress and vitamin and mineral deficiencies all factor into your risk for high blood pressure. Consult your doctor for advice on treatment options before trying home remedies.

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References

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