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How to Prevent an Air Bubble When Mixing

by
author image Beth Rifkin
Based in San Francisco, Beth Rifkin has been writing health- and fitness-related articles since 2005. Her bylines include "Tennis Life," "Ms. Fitness," "Triathlon Magazine," "Inside Tennis," "American Fitness" and others. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Temple University.
How to Prevent an Air Bubble When Mixing
Lightly tap a cake pan after it's filled to eliminate bubbles. Photo Credit SherSor/iStock/Getty Images

Though baking your own cake may seem intimidating, basic batters, such as butter cakes, actually require minimal ingredients and are fairly simple to make. One problem beginning bakers have is the formation of air bubbles in the batter when mixing. This can cause large holes to form as the cake is baking; while the holes will not affect the taste, they are unappealing to most bakers. There are several precautions you can take to protect your batter from air bubbles.

Step 1

Sift your flour with salt and a leavening agent, such as baking soda or baking powder. Mix the three ingredients together in a bowl and then run them through a sifter all at once.

Step 2

Avoid overmixing your batter when you combine the dry and wet ingredients. Mix the batter just enough so all of the ingredients are well combined and then stop. Overmixing can lead to the formation of air bubbles.

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Step 3

Run a butter knife through the batter after it has been fully mixed and before you pour it into the cake pans. The knife will slice through any air bubbles and pop them so they do not leave holes in your finished cake.

Step 4

Fill the cake pans and then lightly tap them on the counter before placing them into the oven. Tapping the pans will force any air bubbles to the surface, which can help avoid holes in your finished cake.

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