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How to Keep Fruit Kabobs Fresh Overnight

by
author image Serena Styles
Serena Styles is a Colorado-based writer who specializes in health, fitness and food. Speaking three languages and working on a fourth, Styles is pursuing a Bachelor's in Linguistics and preparing to travel the world. When Styles isn't writing, she can be found hiking, cooking or working as a certified nutritionist.
How to Keep Fruit Kabobs Fresh Overnight
Fruit kabobs will keep overnight. Photo Credit Ian O'Leary/Dorling Kindersley RF/Getty Images

Fruit kabobs are a fun way to serve cut fruit without the mess. It can take a long time to construct fruit kabobs, mainly because you have to prep the fruit before you skewer it. To save time, you can make fruit kabobs the night before you plan to serve them. To keep fruit kabobs fresh overnight, coat them in a layer of citric acid to prevent them from browning and losing their texture and consistency.

Step 1

Combine the lemon juice and 1/8 cup of cold water in a spray bottle and shake it lightly to blend the liquid.

Step 2

Lay the fruit kabobs on a clean working surface and coat them in a thin, even layer with the liquid from the spray bottle. Flip the fruit kabobs over and spray the other side with the liquid. The lemon keeps the fruit fresh without changing its flavor.

Step 3

Encase each kabob in a sheet of plastic wrap, ensuring no air can reach the fruit. Lay the wrapped kabobs on a plate or baking tray.

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Step 4

Place the plate or tray of kabobs into the refrigerator. Serve them within 12 hours.

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References

  • "Field Guide to Produce"; Aliza Green; 2004
  • "Cold Storage for Fruits & Vegetables"; John Storey, et al.; 1997
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