zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

Thumb Tendinitis Exercises

by
author image Aubrey Bailey
Aubrey Bailey has been writing health-related articles since 2009. Her articles have appeared in ADVANCE for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine. She holds a Bachelor of Science in physical therapy and Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University at Buffalo, as well as a post-professional Doctor of Physical Therapy from Utica College. Dr. Bailey is also a certified hand therapist.
Thumb Tendinitis Exercises
Thumb Tendinitis Exercises

Thumb tendinitis can make daily tasks that are normally taken for granted difficult. You may have pain while writing, typing or texting on your phone. Thumb tendinitis is typically caused by overuse of the muscles that move your thumb. Stretching, range-of-motion and strengthening exercises can reduce pain and weakness caused by thumb tendinitis. If you suspect you have this condition or have thumb pain that interferes with your daily activities, see a doctor for an accurate diagnosis.

Stretching

Thumb stretches are performed using your uninjured hand to move the injured thumb. These exercises should not be painful. If you experience pain, you are stretching too far. Stretches are performed:
-- Out to the side, as if you are grabbing a coffee cup.
-- Straight up, as if you are hitchhiking.
-- Bending down toward the base of your pinky.

Holding your thumb with the fingers of your uninjured hand, slowly move your painful thumb into position until you feel a gentle pulling sensation. Hold this position for 5 to 10 seconds, then relax. Repeat each stretching position 3 times, and perform the entire routine 2 to 3 times each day.

You Might Also Like

Range of Motion

Range-of-motion exercises help prevent stiffness of the thumb joint that can develop with thumb tendinitis. For these exercises, move your thumb into each position as you are able without pain. Range-of-motion exercises include:
-- Lifting your thumb up toward the ceiling.
-- Touching the tip of your thumb to the tip of each finger.
-- Moving your thumb out to the side.
-- Bending your thumb down toward the base of your pinky.

Perform each position 10 times, 2 to 3 times each day.

Isometric Strengthening

Isometric exercises generate muscle force without changing the position of your thumb. These exercises help maintain thumb strength without further straining your inflamed tendons. Apply gentle pressure to the back of your thumb with the index and middle fingers of your uninjured hand. Slowly lift your thumb toward the ceiling while pressing down with your fingers to match the resistance of your thumb lifting. Your thumb should not move. Hold for 6 seconds, then relax. Repeat 5 times once daily. Apply resistance to the front, outside and inside of your thumb using the same technique to strengthen muscles that move your thumb in each of these directions.

Resistance Exercises

Once you are able to perform isometric exercises without pain, you may be ready to progress to resistance exercises. Resistance putty can be used to strengthen muscles that move your thumb in all directions. Perform each of these movements 10 times:
-- Press your thumb down into the putty.
-- Loop the putty over your thumb and lift up toward the ceiling.
-- Loop the putty around your thumb and pull it out to the side.
-- Place the putty between your thumb and the base of your index finger and press in toward the side of your hand.

Work up to 3 sets in a row, 2 times per day. As your strength improves, use stronger putty.

Warnings and Precautions

See a medical professional before attempting thumb exercises if your pain is the result of a direct injury. Seek immediate attention if your thumb appears deformed, will not move or feels numb. Exercises may worsen some conditions, such as a broken bone. See your doctor if your thumb pain persists longer than a few days or if it interferes with your ability to do daily tasks.

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media