• You're all caught up!

Sunchoke Nutrition Information

author image Megan Smith
Megan Smith has been a freelance writer and editor since 2006. She writes about health, fitness, travel, beauty and grooming topics for various print and Internet publications. Smith earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in writing from New York University.
Sunchoke Nutrition Information
Sunchoke flowers growing in a garden. Photo Credit dextorTh/iStock/Getty Images

A sunchoke, also known as a Jerusalem artichoke, is a tuber vegetable that is a nutritious addition to salads, sandwiches and other meals. Mix and match sunchokes with other fresh fruits and vegetables to create a healthy meal.

A Tasty Tuber

Sunchokes, originally named Canadian artichokes, are native to North America. Samuel de Champlain brought them from Canada to England in the 17th century. The grow as a small underground bulb or tuber and have a slightly sweet flavor and crunchy texture. Although commonly thought to be related to the artichoke, a sunchoke is actually a root vegetable in the aster family and resembles a potato in taste and texture.


A sunchoke is moderate in calorie content, with 110 calories in a 1 cup serving of sliced sunchoke. One cup also contains 0 grams fat, 6 mlligrams of sodium and 14 grams of sugar. This amount provides 3 grams of protein and about 2.5 grams of dietary fiber.


Sunchokes are high in several important vitamins and minerals. A one-cup serving provides 6 milligrams of vitamin C, about 2 milligrams of niacin and 30 International Units of vitamin A. It also contains 21 milligrams of calcium, about 5 milligrams of iron, 117 milligrams of phosphorus and over 600 milligrams of potassium.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
  • Female
  • Male
ft. in.



Demand Media