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Good Workout Routines for 13-Year-Old Boys

author image Jennifer Leigh
Jennifer Leigh has been a writer since 2006. She has been published in "Voices of Art Magazine" and on various websites. Leigh holds a Bachelor of Arts in fashion management from the University of the Incarnate Word and is currently pursuing a Master of Educational Psychology at Southern Illinois University.
Good Workout Routines for 13-Year-Old Boys
A young boy jogging on the beach. Photo Credit gbh007/iStock/Getty Images

Exercise is vital for 13-year-old boys for both physical and mental development. It is important to encourage physical activity at this age because it can turn into a habit that will last a lifetime. Sports can be a great way for a 13-year-old boy to get enough physical exercise each day, as they are interactive, fun and social. Weight training is another possibility for teens, but certain restrictions must be taken into consideration so that it is safe for growing bodies.

Walk, Jog, or Run

A 60-minute period of walking, jogging or running -- three days per week -- should to start with a warm-up session of walking for five to 10 minutes before slowly increasing speed to a jog or running pace. This can continue for 45 minutes, with short breaks if needed, and be followed by a cool-down with a five- to 10-minute walk. This can also be done in a sports setting, such as soccer practice, or can be broken up into shorter segments throughout the day.

Cycling as an Aerobic Activity

Bike riding is an activity that most teenagers enjoy, and it provides an excellent aerobic workout in addition to being a fun and recreational. After stretching of legs, arms and back muscles for five minutes, a slow ride for five to 10-minutes serves as a warm-up of muscles and to build the heart rate. After that, a moderate to vigorous pace for 30 to 45 minutes should be followed by a cool-down period of five to 10 minutes of slow biking or walking.

Gentle Plyometrics

Teens should warm-up for plyometric exercises by jogging for five to 10 minutes. Thirteen-year-olds should begin doing plyometrics for a short time period and gradually work their way to a longer routine. This should be done on two non-consecutive days per week. A good beginner's routine would involve an upper-body exercise, such as chest passes or overhead passes with a medicine ball. That might be followed by a lower-body exercise, such as double-leg jumps or box jumps. The routine may include six to 10 repetitions of one to three sets of each exercise per session. This should be followed by a five-minute cool-down walk or jog.

Yoga for Flexibility and Mindfulness

Yoga is a good exercise for 13-year-old boys because it helps them stay flexible, increases muscle and bone strength, and often raises levels of mindfulness in day-to-day life. An example of a simple yoga routine begins with a Mountain pose, moves to the Tabletop pose, then on to Downward-Facing Dog. Child's pose helps the boys rest for a moment before moving into Warrior Two pose. From there, they may move into Tree, Bridge and -- finally -- Corpse pose to relax for a few minutes before ending the session. Teens should be reminded to breathe during the poses.

Weight Training for Strength

Thirteen-year-old boys who have gone through puberty can safely engage in a strength-training routine utilizing their own body weight for resistance. This should be done three times per week for approximately 30 minutes per session. Teens should begin with a five to 10-minute warm-up consisting of walking, jogging or another cardio activity at an easy pace. Exercises in the strength-training session should include push-ups, pull-ups, sit-ups, bicycle crunches, step-ups, tricep dips, back extensions, lunges and squats. Boys should start by doing one set of 15 repetitions of each exercise and work their way to three sets of eight to 16 repetitions of each exercise. An experienced fitness professional should supervise the exercises to ensure proper form until no longer necessary.

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