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How Much Carrot Juice Is Too Much?

author image Matthew Lee
Matthew Lee has been writing professionally since 2007. Past and current research projects have explored the effect of a diagnosis of breast cancer on lifestyle and mental health and adherence to lifestyle-based (i.e. nutrition and exercise) and drug therapy treatment programs. He holds a Master of Arts in psychology from Carleton University and is working toward his doctorate in health psychology.
How Much Carrot Juice Is Too Much?
Two glasses of carrot juice next to a bunch of carrots. Photo Credit A_Lein/iStock/Getty Images

Carrot juice is extremely high in vitamin A and contains large amounts of other nutrients, like vitamin K and potassium. Although you can potentially overdose on some vitamins and minerals, these nutrients are harmless even at very high doses. However, this doesn't mean that you can drink as much carrot juice as you'd like. As carrot juice contains a lot of sugar, you should try not to drink more than one glass per day.

Vitamin A

The recommended daily intakes for vitamin A are 900 micrograms for men and 700 micrograms for women. As 1 cup of carrot juice provides 2,256 micrograms of vitamin A, a single serving contains 2 to 3 times more than you need in a day. Over the long term, such a high vitamin A intake can cause carotenodermia. This harmless condition results in your skin turning yellow-orange, which will go away if you temporarily stop drinking carrot juice.


Your body can tolerate even extremely high intakes of the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in carrot juice. For example, no harmful side effects occur even if you consume 30 times more vitamin A than you need. However, 1 cup of carrot juice provides more than 9 grams of sugar. As a high sugar intake can increase your risk of diabetes and obesity, the Harvard School of Public Health recommends that you limit yourself to one glass of juice per day.

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