zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

The Acid in Oranges

by
author image Karen Curley
Karen Curley has more than 18 years experience in health and nutrition, specializing in healthy food choices for families. She received USDA certification in food components, nutrient sources, food groups and infant/child nutrition, and holds a B.A. in English from the University of Massachusetts. Curley is also an avid gardener, home renovator, Collie breeder, dog groomer and dog trainer.
The Acid in Oranges
Oranges growing on a tree branch. Photo Credit zenstock/iStock/Getty Images

Oranges contain ascorbic acid, also known as vitamin C. Other acids that contribute to the nutritional profile of oranges include folic, pantothenic, hydroxycinnamic, citric, malic and oxalic. This citrus fruit packs a nutritional punch that makes it an excellent addition to most diets; however, the amount of acid in oranges can irritate some people with sensitive stomachs.

Ascorbic Acid

Your body does not store vitamin C, so you have to replace it daily. Eating one orange gives you a full day’s recommended dose of Vitamin C. Ascorbic acid aids healthy cell growth for making skin, blood vessels, muscles and cartilage. It is essential for healthy bones and healing damaged tissue. Ascorbic acid helps fight heart disease, cancer and arthritis. If you do not get enough vitamin C each day, you become susceptible to high blood pressure, bleeding gums, dry skin, bruising and plaque in your blood vessels.

Folic Acid

Folic acid, more commonly known as vitamin B or folate, builds your cells and makes red blood cells. It also helps prevent strokes, heart disease and colon cancer. Folic acid is water-soluble, which means your body loses it every day through urine, so you must replace it from the food you eat. During pregnancy, it is important to eat foods rich in folic acid to prevent neurological birth defects and cleft palate in babies.

Pantothenic Acid

Vitamin B5, known as pantothenic acid, helps your body change the carbohydrates you eat into glucose for energy. You need to replace pantothenic acid every day, and it is essential for adrenal gland function, producing red blood cells and keeping your digestive tract healthy. If you do not take in enough pantothenic acid, you may be tired, depressed, irritable and develop respiratory problems.

Hydroxycinnamic Acids

Hydroxycinnamic acids are phytochemicals that help your immune system fight cancer and heart disease. You can obtain hydroxycinnamic acids by eating citrus fruits, like oranges, in your daily diet.

Citric Acid

Citric acid, found in all citrus fruits, adds the sour taste to lemons, limes, grapefruit and oranges. Citric acid is added to other food products, such as candy, soda and juice, to make them taste sour. Its acidic quality makes it useful as a preservative for canned foods and preserving meat. Another use for citric acid is as a household cleaner.

Malic Acid

Oranges, apples, rhubarb, tomatoes, peaches and cherries are a few of the fruits that contain malic acid. Malic acid crystals are used as a flavoring in wine; they also are used as preservatives for ice cream, frozen juices, baked goods and fruit preserves.

Oxalic

Orange leaves contain oxalic acid. Too much oxalic acid in your body contributes to the development of kidney stones and gallstones. The acid combines with your body’s calcium and metals to form crystals, and it also slows the absorption of calcium in your body.

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
Lose Weight. Feel Great Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

CURRENTLY TRENDING

Demand Media

Our Privacy Policy has been updated. Please take a moment and read it here.