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The Best Cherries for Gout

by
author image Susan Kaye
Susan Kaye writes about alternative health care, the medicinal value of foods and natural remedies for healing body, mind and spirit. She is currently retired from an active classical homeopathy practice and enjoys sharing her passion for alternative medicine in her writing with those seeking health care freedom.
The Best Cherries for Gout
Cherries hanging from a tree. Photo Credit TongRo Images/TongRo Images/Getty Images

Overview

If you have gout, then you know the excruciating pain and suffering you can experience during a flare-up. Of all the medicines and natural treatments available for relieving the pain of gout, cherries rise to the top for being able to soothe and reduce inflammation, swelling and pain, as well as that of arthritis and other joint-related inflammations. Not only are cherries touted by some as a wonder treatment, but they are fast-acting and they’re good for you.

Raw, Cooked or Canned?

Gout is a form of arthritis caused by the breakdown of proteins into purines, which are further broken down into uric acid. Excess uric acid in the blood crystallizes and is deposited in the joints, causing excruciating pain, inflammation and swelling. Regardless of whether cherries are consumed raw, cooked or canned, or whether you drink the cooking juice or take cherry extract, these little red fruits will be helpful in relieving your joint pain and swelling, according to Mike Adams at NaturalNews.com. The pigments that make cherries red are called anthocyanins, and they assist the body in dissolving the uric acid crystals, helping them to be excreted by the kidneys. Cherries are also high in potassium and contribute to helping the body maintain a slightly alkaline state, which prevents the formation of acids in the blood, especially uric acid.

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Sour Cherries vs. Black Cherries

There’s one camp that prefers black cherries and another that recommends sour cherries for their ability to reduce uric acid levels and lessen the pain and inflammation of gout, explains Mothernature.com. Both work, but it seems that sour cherries are more highly favored by natural health practitioners and slightly more effective. Both kinds of cherries are safe to consume and have no side effects. The recommended amount ranges from 6 cherries to 8 oz. per day. Eat them several times a day and experiment until you find the perfect amount for you. Expect to see results within less than 24 hours.

Cherry Juice and Cherry Juice Concentrate

Drinking tart cherry juice has been reported to do wonders for gout and other sources of severe foot pain, reports the People’s Pharmacy website. Light, tart and refreshing but very potent, tart cherry juice should be mixed with water in a ratio of approximately one part cherry juice to two parts water, with a good amount being 3 oz. cherry juice to 6 oz. water, but mix to satisfy your tastes. Drink two to three glasses daily during an attack and then one glass a day for maintenance. Black cherry juice concentrate can also be consumed for relief from gout pain. Much sweeter than the tart cherry juice, it should also be mixed with water. Experiment with the quantity but start with 1 to 2 tbsp. of concentrate in 6 to 8 oz. of water, twice daily during an attack and once a day for maintenance.

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References

Demand Media