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How to Cook Brisket Over Open Fire Pit Smoke

by
author image Rose Erickson
Rose Erickson has been a professional writer since 2010. She specializes in fitness, parenting, beauty, health, nutrition and saving money, and writes for several online publications including The Krazy Coupon Lady. She is also a novelist and a mother of three.
How to Cook Brisket Over Open Fire Pit Smoke
A plate of smoked brisket. Photo Credit Otakeja/iStock/Getty Images

You don’t have to just stick to the traditional marshmallows and hot dogs when cooking over open fire pit smoke. Brisket, a piece of beef that comes from the lower chest of the cow, is often a tough cut of meat. However, slow cooking it over an open fire pit can help tenderize while imparting a smoky flavor into the meat. You don’t need much more than some flavorings and a few pieces of wood to turn a tough piece of brisket into a flavorful meal.

Step 1

Rub the brisket with oil and rub seasonings such as garlic powder, salt and pepper into the meat. Seal with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator or cooler overnight.

Step 2

Remove the meat from the refrigerator and allow it to sit at room temperature while you build your fire.

Step 3

Carve or drill approximately three holes into a block of wood. Save time by doing this ahead of time or before you leave home. Insert 6-inch long sticks into the holes.

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Step 4

Impale the brisket on the sticks and place the block of wood on the outside edge of the fire and allow to cook.

Step 5

Turn the meat over once browned on one side. Cook until a meat thermometer reads about 160 F when inserted into the thickest part of the meat. This can take about one hour per lb.

Step 6

Allow the brisket to rest for about 10 minutes before cutting and serving. This will help the juices redistribute into the meat.

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References

  • "Countryside & Small Stock Journal"; Cooking Over the Campfire; Tom C. Tabor; 1998
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