zig
0

Notifications

  • You're all caught up!

How to Make a Drink With Electrolytes Without Sugar

by
author image Frankie Smith
Frankie Smith brings over 12 years of experience in health care to her positions as a mental health clinician, policy analyst and director in Aboriginal health. Her writing experience has primarily been in the area of strategic planning and policy development. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Winnipeg.
How to Make a Drink With Electrolytes Without Sugar
Sodium is an essential electrolyte. Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

Electrolyte replacement is essential during periods of excessive sweating to avoid a serious and potentially life-threatening condition called hyponatremia. This condition occurs when too much sodium is lost in the fluids around your cells, causing water to rush into your cells, which leaves them swelling with excess water. Your body becomes overwhelmed, particularly your brain, resulting symptoms such as disorientation, fatigue, confusion, hallucinations and coma. Rehydrate and re-establish your electrolyte balance without the sugar and additives of commercial preparations, by making your own electrolyte replacement beverage.

Step 1

Add sea salt, lemon juice and water to a shaker container. Shake thoroughly.

Step 2

Sweeten to taste with refined stevia extract. Stevia is a sugar substitute with 0 calories; it is sweeter than sugar.

Step 3

Drink small amounts at a time, re-shaking frequently to ensure the sea salt does not settle.

Step 4

Using during or immediately after exercise to replenish fluids and electrolytes.

You Might Also Like

Related Searches

LiveStrong Calorie Tracker
THE LIVESTRONG.COM MyPlate Nutrition, Workouts & Tips
GOAL
  • Gain 2 pounds per week
  • Gain 1.5 pounds per week
  • Gain 1 pound per week
  • Gain 0.5 pound per week
  • Maintain my current weight
  • Lose 0.5 pound per week
  • Lose 1 pound per week
  • Lose 1.5 pounds per week
  • Lose 2 pounds per week
GENDER
  • Female
  • Male
lbs.
ft. in.

References

Demand Media