How to Cook a Bottom Round Thin Sliced Steak in a Frying Pan

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Thin sliced bottom round steak can be cooked in a skillet, but it's easy to over-cook the meat and make the steaks tough.
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Thin sliced bottom round steak can be cooked in a skillet, but it's easy to over-cook the meat and make the steaks tough. Bottom round steaks come from the beef rump, a tough cut of meat with connective tissue.

Bottom round steak is best broken down with moist cooking methods such as braising, according to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Rounds steaks are also relatively lean, making them a healthier choice than cuts such as ribeyes.

When cooking thin sliced round steak recipes in a skillet, try a marinade to add flavor, tenderize the meat and provide some moisture while cooking. A meat mallet helps tenderize the steak before cooking.

Read more: A Roast Beef Recipe That Makes for the Perfect Entrée and Next-Day Sandwiches

Step 1: Pound the Bottom Round Steak

Lay the bottom round steaks on a cutting board and pound them flat with a meat mallet, concentrating your efforts specifically around the connective tissue that separates the different sections of meat within the steak.

If the meat at one end of the steak is thicker, pound it to uniform thickness so the steak cooks evenly.

Step 2: Marinate for Tender Round Steak

Marinate your meat for a tender bottom round steak. Place the steak in a bowl with a tight-fitting lid. Pour your choice of marinade over the steak and place it in the refrigerator to marinate for at least one hour or overnight. Try a bottled marinade or mix your own with basic ingredients in your pantry.

Mix an acidic component, such as apple cider vinegar or balsamic vinegar, with a healthy fat ,such as olive oil or coconut oil, plus your choice of seasonings and spices for extra flavor.

Step 3: Oil the Pan

Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of cooking oil to line the bottom of the skillet, just enough for lubrication without adding too much additional fat. Preheat the skillet over medium heat. Steak is typically pan-seared over high heat, but medium heat is better to prevent over-cooking thin steaks.

Step 4: Add Your Meat

Add the bottom round steak to the preheated skillet. Lower the steak in the skillet away from your body to prevent oil spatters.

Step 5: Brown Both Sides

Cook the steak for about three minutes on the first side or until the steak begins to brown. Flip the bottom round steak and cook for another three minutes to brown the second side.

Step 6: Check the Temperature

Insert a meat thermometer in the center of the tender round steak to check for doneness. Bottom round steak is most tender when cooked no more than medium-rare, or about 145 degrees Fahrenheit — the minimum safe temperature for consumption of beef, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue cooking, flipping occasionally, until the steak reaches the desired level of doneness. The total cooking time depends on the actual thickness of the steak, so refer to a meat thermometer when gauging the doneness.

Step 7: Remove and Rest

Remove the steak from the skillet and allow it to rest for at least three minutes to redistribute the juices throughout the steak.

Read more: How to Cook a Tender Steak on the Stove

Follow These Tips

Try cutting the thin-cut steaks into narrow strips and cooking it with some sliced vegetables to make a simple, healthy stir-fry dish.

Look for bottom round steaks from grass-fed beef which tends to have less fat than grain-fed beef, as well as a higher amount of omega-3 fatty acids — healthy fats that can help reduce risk of heart disease, according to Mayo Clinic.

Additionally, grain-fed cattle are often overfed and pumped up with hormones and antibiotics to make them grow rapidly in preparation for slaughter.

Things You'll Need

  • Cutting board

  • Meat mallet

  • Bowl with lid

  • Marinade

  • Skillet

  • Oil

  • Tongs

  • Meat thermometer

  • Plate

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