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How Many Calories Should a 15 Month Child Consume?

author image Amy Dixon
Amy Dixon has been writing on a local level since 2005, focusing on health and fitness. She is an ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist and holds a Master of Science degree in exercise and wellness promotion from Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania.
How Many Calories Should a 15 Month Child Consume?
A baby sitting with his family at the kitchen table. Photo Credit Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Blend Images/Getty Images

At 15 months old your toddler is learning to explore everything around him, including food. Your child who ate anything as a baby may now refuse to eat anything you offer. During this time of discovering likes and dislikes, there are guidelines you should follow to make sure your child gets the calories needed for healthy growth and development.

Caloric Needs

During your child’s first year of life, their growth rate was at its highest. Once your baby enters the toddler stage, their growth rate and energy needs are reduced. Toddlers need between 1,000 and 1,300 calories per day depending on their size, according to Keepkidshealthy.com.

Milk and Juice

Your child should have no more than 16-24 ounces, or 300 to 445 calories, of milk per day, according HealthyChildren.org, a website of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The AAP also recommends no more than one serving of juice per day which will yield 60-90 calories.

Meals and Snacks

After drinking between 360 and 435 calories of milk and juice, only 600 to 950 calories remain to split across meals and snacks. To ensure proper growth and development, you should aim to feed your toddler healthy foods, and not restrict fats and cholesterol. Aim to provide meals and snacks that circle around the five basic food groups: proteins, fruits, vegetables, dairy and carbohydrates.

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High Expectations

One problem parents have is realizing what realistic portion sizes are for a toddler. The average toddler portion should be about one-fourth of an adult serving size. The only time you really need to be concerned is if your toddler isn’t growing as expected or isn’t as active as they should be.

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