List of Low Carb Flours

scoop s of gluten free flour
Different baking flours. (Image: marekuliasz/iStock/Getty Images)

Low-carb baking can be a challenge because many of the substitutes for wheat flour, such as bean flour, are very carbohydrate-dense. Flours made with nuts, seeds, soy and coconut are good options, but you will have to play with oven temperature, baking time and recipe ingredients. For the best results, look for recipes that call for your preferred low-carb flour. Remember that although the flour may be low-carb, other ingredients such as sugar will add carbohydrates.

So Good Soy

You can replace up to 30 percent of wheat flour with soy flour in baked goods including bread, muffins, pancakes and cookies. A 1/4-cup serving of soy flour has a total carbohydrate content of 8 grams and 3 grams of dietary fiber. Soy flour causes quick browning, so watch baked goods carefully, and take them out of the oven a little early.

Seed Flours

There are several different types of flour made from seeds. Flaxseed meal is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and can be used in muffins, pancakes and other baked goods as an oil or butter substitute. A 1/4-cup serving has 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although more difficult to find, sunflower seed flour is very low in carbohydrates with less than 6 grams per 1/4 cup.

Just Plain Nutty

Almond flour works well as a wheat flour substitute. Because it is so dense and crumbly, you'll need an extra egg to give baked goods rise and structure. Lower the oven temperature by 25 degrees Fahrenheit and allow food to cool completely before serving. A 1/4-cup serving of almond flour has 6 grams of carbohydrates and 3 grams of fiber. At only 5 grams of carbohydrates per 1/4 cup, hazelnut flour is another low-carbohydrate option. It is a good source of vitamin E and healthy fats. Replace up to 30 percent of wheat with hazelnut flour in baked goods such as pie crust and cookies.

A Bunch of Coconuts

Baking with coconut flour is a little tricky since it absorbs a lot of water. For every 1 cup of coconut flour, you'll need to add 1 cup of water and six eggs. Substitute 1/4 to 1/3 cups of coconut flour for every 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Another option is a blend of 3 parts almond flour to 1 part coconut flour. Coconut flour is a little higher-carb than nut or seed flours with 16 grams of carbohydrates per 1/4 cup.

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