3 Ways to Treat Eye Floaters and Spots

Close-up of young woman's closed eye
A woman with her eyes closed. (Image: moodboard/moodboard/Getty Images)

Though seeing dark circles and squiggles in front of your eyes isn't pleasant, it usually isn't harmful either. Rather, eye floaters are often a natural yet irritating part of aging, and the best way to treat them is to do your best to ignore the visual disturbances. Caused by shadows falling on your retina due to deposits in the jelly-like substance that fills the back two-thirds of your eye, the dark, grayish floating specks are most noticeable when you look at something bright, like the afternoon sky. To temporarily get rid of the shadows in your vision, simply close your eyes or sit in a very dark room. Where there's no light, there are also no floaters. But you can't walk around with your eyes closed all day. If the dark spots get in your way when you're trying to read or watch television, try moving your eye around a bit. This makes the jelly inside move as well, and it could shift the floating deposit out of your way. Another good thing to know is that as you live with your floaters, your brain may also learn to ignore them. Just like you forget you're wearing glasses after a while, you can forget you're seeing floaters as well.

Though seeing dark circles and squiggles in front of your eyes isn't pleasant, it usually isn't harmful either. Rather, eye floaters are often a natural yet irritating part of aging, and the best way to treat them is to do your best to ignore the visual disturbances. Caused by shadows falling on your retina due to deposits in the jelly-like substance that fills the back two-thirds of your eye, the dark, grayish floating specks are most noticeable when you look at something bright, like the afternoon sky. To temporarily get rid of the shadows in your vision, simply close your eyes or sit in a very dark room. Where there's no light, there are also no floaters. But you can't walk around with your eyes closed all day. If the dark spots get in your way when you're trying to read or watch television, try moving your eye around a bit. This makes the jelly inside move as well, and it could shift the floating deposit out of your way. Another good thing to know is that as you live with your floaters, your brain may also learn to ignore them. Just like you forget you're wearing glasses after a while, you can forget you're seeing floaters as well.

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