The Ultimate Guide to the Calories in Coffee and Tea

Coffee and tea have barely any calories — but add-ins like milk and sweeteners can quickly change the nutrition facts of your favorite caffeinated (or decaf!) beverages.
Image Credit: Linda Raymond/iStock/GettyImages

A morning cup of coffee or tea is more than just emotionally pleasing — it's also a relatively healthy way to start the day, given that it's low in calories and comes with additional health perks.

Consider coffee's health benefits: The brew is linked to a lower risk of several diseases, from type 2 diabetes to depression, per the Cleveland Clinic. Tea is also a good-for-you beverage, full of polyphenols that act as antioxidants, which may help reduce the risk of some diseases, per the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

But add-ins can change the nutrition profile of your favorite cup of coffee or tea pretty quickly. Keep scrolling to learn about the number of calories, nutrition info and amount of caffeine in coffee, tea and popular add-ins.

Calories in Coffee and Nutrition Information

From flat whites in Australia to espresso in Italy, there are about as many types of and ways to drink coffee as there are people who drink it around the world. But your average cup (6 ounces) of regular black coffee offers the following calories and nutrition info, according to the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 2
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% Daily Value (DV)
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 3.6 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 0 g
  • Protein:​ 0.2 g, 0% DV
  • Calcium:​ 3.6 mg, 0% DV
  • Potassium:​ 87.2 mg, 2% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 5.3 mg, 0% DV

The amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee varies. So does the size: A "cup" of coffee may be defined as anything from 6 to 8 ounces (the actual size of a cup measurement) — and, of course, sizing will vary from one café to another.

On average, an 8-ounce cup contains 95 milligrams of caffeine, per the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. But that's just an average: The same amount of coffee from Starbucks (brewed with Pike's Blend) clocks in at 155 milligrams of caffeine, per the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

Warning

Many of us drink coffee and tea specifically for its caffeine content, but caffeine can cause unpleasant side effects, such as anxiety, sleep disruption, restlessness and a fast heart rate, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine. On the flip side of that coin, if you’re in the habit of enjoying caffeinated beverages, quitting that daily habit — especially cold turkey — can lead to headaches, irritability and other withdrawal symptoms.

Coffee Blends

Specific brands and blends will have different values for calories and nutrition info. Scroll on for the calorie counts and nutrition facts for common coffee brands and varieties.

Arabic Coffee

If you order a cup of coffee, chances are it's made with Arabic beans — they're the most common and popular beans, per the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In fact, Arabic or Arabica coffee, which is made with Arabica beans and originated in Ethiopia, makes up 75 to 80 percent of the coffee produced around the world, according to the Coffee Research Institute.

This bean is the likely starting point for the bag or tin of ground coffee that you pick up at the grocery store, as well as beverages that you order in coffee shops. And because Arabic coffee is the most common type of coffee in the word, the nutrition facts for your average cup mentioned above apply here: An 8-ounce pour of Arabic coffee contains 2 calories and around 95 milligrams of caffeine.

The other variety of coffee — Robusta — may be easier to grow and have higher levels of caffeine, but it's considered less delicious, per the Coffee Research Institute.

No matter which bean your coffee is made from, the beverage is rich in antioxidants (which help ward off the damage caused by free radicals), per the Mayo Clinic. The antioxidants may also have an anti-inflammatory effect, per the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Coffee also contains polyphenols (aka, micronutrients found in plants), including chlorogenic acid and quinic acid, per the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. These phytonutrients have antioxidant effects on the body and may also promote the destruction of abnormal cells for potential cancer prevention. There is what the American Institute for Cancer Research deems "probable" evidence that drinking coffee cuts the risk of endometrial and liver cancers, and "limited suggestive" evidence that it reduces the risk of mouth, pharynx, larynx and skin cancers.

Plus, you'll also get nutrients, such as potassium, niacin and magnesium, when you drink coffee, per the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee

Vietnamese iced coffee is made by adding sweetened condensed milk and ice to strong, dark-roast brewed coffee. The coffee on its own has virtually no calories — it's that thick, luscious condensed milk that's the source of the calories in this beverage.

The calories in Vietnamese iced coffee vary based on how much canned milk is added to the cup. Between 2 and 4 tablespoons is typical. If you added 2 tablespoons (1 fluid ounce) of condensed milk to your 6-ounce cup of coffee, the beverage would have the following calories and nutritional information, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 125
  • Total Fat:​ 3.3 g, 5% DV
    • Saturated Fat:​ 2.1 g, 10% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 13 mg, 4% DV
  • Sodium:​ 52.1 mg, 2% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 20.8 g, 7% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 20.8 g
  • Protein:​ 3.2 g, 6% DV
  • Calcium:​ 112.1 mg, 8% DV
  • Potassium:​ 228.9 mg, 4.8% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 101.9 mg, 8% DV
  • Vitamin C:​ 1 mg, 1% DV
  • Vitamin D:​ 0.1 μg, 0% DV
  • Iron:​ 0.1 mg, 0% DV

Coffee With Semi-Skimmed, Low-Fat or Nonfat Milk

Add a dash of milk to your cup of java and you'll change the drink's nutritional makeup.

Skim milk — or skimmed milk, as it's known in the United Kingdom — is whole milk with the fat removed. Semi-skimmed milk — which is common in the U.K. — has a fat content of 1.7 percent, according to the Dairy Council for Northern Ireland. Think of semi-skimmed milk as an in-between option, with half the fat content of whole milk.

Similar varieties of low-fat milk in the United States have either 1 or 2 percent fat content levels.

Here's a look at the nutritional breakdown of your cup of coffee if you add 1 fluid ounce (2 tablespoons) of 2 percent milk to your 6-ounce cup, according to the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 17
  • Total Fat:​ 0.6 g, 1% DV
    • Saturated Fat:​ 0.4 g, 2% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 2.4 mg, 1% DV
  • Sodium:​ 15.9 mg, 1% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 1.5 g, 0% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 1.5 g
  • Protein:​ 1.2 g, 2% DV
  • Vitamin C:​ 0.1 mg, 0% DV
  • Vitamin D:​ 0.4 μg, 2% DV
  • Calcium:​ 40.2 mg, 3% DV
  • Potassium:​ 129.9 mg, 3% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 33.4 mg, 3% DV

Using 2 percent milk will deliver about the same calories and nutrition as semi-skimmed milk. You'll take in fewer calories if you choose to use 1 percent milk. Here's the nutritional breakdown for adding 1 fluid ounce (2 tablespoons) of 1 percent milk to your 6-ounce cup, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 15
  • Total Fat:​ 0.3 g, 0% DV
    • Saturated Fat:​ 0.2 g, 1% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 1.5 mg, 1% DV
  • Sodium:​ 17 mg, 1% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 1.5 g, 1% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 1.6 g
  • Protein:​ 1.2 g, 2% DV
  • Vitamin D:​ 0.4 μg, 2% DV
  • Calcium:​ 41.7 mg, 3% DV
  • Potassium:​ 133 mg, 3% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 34.3 mg, 3% DV

Mocha Coffee

Add steamed milk and chocolate to your everyday cup of coffee, and you've got yourself a mocha. It's a delicious option, but a mocha can easily become packed with sugar and calories, particularly if it's topped with whipped cream.

Many versions of mocha coffee are available, including hot and iced commercially prepared varieties that have low-fat or nonfat milk ingredients and instant powders for use at home.

Mocha-flavored instant powders are convenient. To prepare, all you have to do is add hot water. An 8-ounce mocha has the following calories and nutritional information, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 14
  • Total Fat:​ 0.6g, 1% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 0.2g, 1% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 9 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 2 g, 1% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 1.3 g
  • Protein:​ 0.1 g, 0% DV
  • Calcium:​ 6.8 mg, 1% DV
  • Potassium:​ 27 mg, 1% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 7.4 mg, 1% DV

A medium mocha latte from Dunkin' Donuts (with no sweetener and skim milk) has the following calories and nutrition:

  • Calories:​ 250
  • Total Fat:​ 4 g, 5% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 0.5 g, 3% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 160 mg, 7% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 53 g, 19% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 4 g, 14% DV
    • Sugar:​ 33 g
    • Added sugar:​ 27 g, 54% DV
  • Protein:​ 3 g, 6% DV
  • Vitamin D:​ 4 mcg, 20% DV
  • Calcium:​ 391 mg, 30% DV
  • Iron:​ 1 mg, 6% DV
  • Potassium:​ 496 mg, 10% DV

Related Reading

Coffee Brands

There are many coffee brands out there, from the ones sold solely in the grocery store to the bags and tins from familiar coffee shops, such as Dunkin' Donuts, Peets' Coffee and Starbucks. Take a look at the nutritional information for some likely familiar brands.

Maxwell House Coffee Nutrition

Maxwell House coffee comes in several varieties, including regular ground coffee, decaffeinated coffee, instant coffee, K-Cup pods, iced coffee and Cafe Style Flavors.

A 6-ounce cup of coffee made from Maxwell House Original Roast will have roughly the same calories and nutritional makeup as any cup of coffee (see above).

Maxwell House International Cafe coffee mixes come with creamer and sugar already added. Here is the nutritional makeup of a serving (1 1/3 tablespoons, or 17 grams) of Maxwell House International Cinnamon Dulce Cappuccino Cafe Beverage:

  • Calories:​ 70
    • Calories from fat:​ 15
  • Total Fat:​ 2 g, 3% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 2 g, 10% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 65 mg, 3% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 14 g, 5% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 11 g
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV

The Maxwell House International Cafe coffees are available in both caffeinated and decaffeinated varieties.

Instant Coffee

You'll find many options when it comes to instant coffee. In addition to old-guard brands such as Folgers, Taster's Choice and Nescafé, newer brands, such as Starbucks Via, are gaining ground.

With minimal prep and equipment needs, instant coffee provides immediate, low-effort, caffeinated gratification.

Instant black coffee has so few nutrients that it doesn't require any nutrition information on its packaging. The nutritional content for black instant coffee is just about the same as a cup of black coffee brewed from ground whole beans.

Black Instant Coffee

Here are the calories and nutrition facts for a cup (6 ounces) of instant coffee prepared with hot water, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 4
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 7.2 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 0 g
    • Added sugar:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Iron:​ 0.1 mg, 0% DV
  • Calcium:​ 7.2 mg, 1% DV
  • Potassium:​ 53.7 mg, 1% DV
  • Phosphorus:​ 5.4 mg, 0% DV

Instant Coffee With Milk

Once you add milk to your coffee — whether it's instant or brewed — you've changed it from a beverage with virtually no calories or nutrients to one with a bit more nutritional substance.

If you have instant coffee with milk, here's how many calories you'll add:

  • Skim milk:​ 1 fluid oz. (2 tbsp.) of skim milk has 10 calories, per the USDA.
  • 1 percent milk:​ 1 fluid oz. (2 tbsp.) of 1 percent milk has 13 calories, per the USDA.
  • 2 percent milk:​ 1 fluid oz. (2 tbsp.) of 2 percent milk has 15 calories, per the USDA.
  • Whole milk:​ 1 fluid oz. (2 tbsp.) of whole milk has 19 calories, per the USDA.
  • Cream (half and half):​ 1 fluid oz. (2 tbsp.) of half and half has 40 calories, per the USDA.

There are plenty of milk alternatives available, too. See how many calories will be added to your beverage when you splash in 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of the following:

  • Soy milk:​ 9 calories, per the USDA.
  • Almond milk (unsweetened):​ 4 calories, per the USDA.
  • Oat milk (low-fat):​ 11 calories, per the USDA (varies by brand).

Nescafé Clasico Coffee

Nescafé coffee products can be found in most grocery stores and their products range from simple coffee beans to cappuccino mixes to frappuccinos and more.

It's the originator of instant coffee, launching in 1938, according to food manufacturer Nestle. Instant coffee has a long shelf-life, and is easy to serve.

Nescafé sells a variety of versions of instant coffee, including Nescafé Clasico, which is available in a jar or in individual pouches, in a variety of blends (French roast, Colombian, a house blend and so on), per the Nescafé website. It's available in caffeinated and decaffeinated forms.

A 6-ounce cup of Nescafé Clasico — regardless of whether it comes from an individual pouch or is scooped from a jar — will have the same nutritional makeup of any cup of black coffee, namely 2 calories and around 95 milligrams of caffeine. (Adding sweetener or milk will change the brew's nutrition facts.)

Nescafé Coffee and Cappuccino

As well as regular ol' instant coffee, Nescafé also makes many other instant coffee-related products including espresso, café au lait, latte macchiato, americano, coretto, ristretto, romano, con panna, granita de caffe, mocha and frappe.

A serving of Nescafé Gold Cappuccino Instant Coffee has 3 tablespoons of the coffee, which is then mixed with hot water. The calories and nutritional information of a cup of Nescafé cappuccino are:

  • Calories:​ 90
  • Total Fat:​ 1.5 g, 2% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 1.5 g, 8% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 75 mg, 3% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 19 g, 6% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 1 g, 4% DV
    • Sugar:​ 13 g
  • Protein:​ 2 g, 4% DV
  • Potassium:​ 200 mg, 4% DV
  • Calcium:​ 75 mg, 6% DV

Each serving of Nescafé instant coffee contains between 50 and 90 milligrams of caffeine, per the Nescafé website.

Folgers Instant Coffee

Folgers Instant Coffee comes in regular or decaf versions and as crystals and sticks. When you brew up a cup of this instant coffee, you'll get the same calories and general nutrition makeup as a standard cup of black coffee (see details above).

Shifting to the instant Folgers Cappuccino will add calories. Folgers French Vanilla Flavored Cappuccino, for instance, has both milk and sweetener added. Here's the nutritional information and calories for a 3-tablespoon serving:

  • Calories:​ 130
  • Total Fat:​ 3.5 g, 5% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 3.5 g, 18% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 150 mg, 6% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 24 g, 9% DV
    • Sugar:​ 20 g
    • Added sugar:​ 16 g, 32% DV
  • Protein:​ 1 g, 2% DV
  • Calcium:​ 32 mg, 2% DV
  • Potassium:​ 228 mg, 4% DV

Vending Machine French Vanilla Coffee

Vending machine coffee is available all over, including workplaces, convenience stores and gas stations. Along with black coffee, these vending machines dispense more indulgent fare, too, such as fragrant, sweet French vanilla cappuccino.

The calories and nutritional value of these vending machine blends vary, depending on which product the machine dispenses. In general, you'll find that sugar is the first ingredient on the list, and these mixes typically include corn syrup and coconut oil as well.

Here's a look at the nutritional information and calories in one single-serving, 15-ounce cup of one type of French vanilla cappuccino, according to the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 80
  • Total Fat:​ 4.5g, 7% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 4g, 20% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 170 mg, 7% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 9 g, 3% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 5 g
    • Added sugar:​ 5 g, 10% DV
  • Protein:​ 1 g, 2% DV

Café Coffee

You'll find many decadent beverage options at coffee shops that involve espresso, blenders and all manner of tools and blends that are likely more complex than what you can manage at home.

Starbucks Matcha Green Tea Crème Frappuccino

Starbucks' signature Frappuccino blended beverages are available in numerous inventive flavor combinations, like the previously popular Starbucks Tazo Green Tea Frappuccino, which is no longer available. The latest green tea Frappuccino, the Matcha Green Tea Crème Frappuccino, mixes matcha powder together with milk and ice. By default, this frappuccino is topped with sweetened whipped cream.

The concoction is available in Starbucks' three sizes: tall, grande and venti. A grande (16 ounces) Matcha Green Tea Crème Frappuccino made with whole milk, but without whipped cream, has the following calories and nutritional information:

  • Calories:​ 410
    • Calories from fat:​ 110
  • Total Fat:​ 15 g, 19% DV
    • Saturated fat:​ 9 g, 45% DV
    • Trans fat:​ 0.5 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 50 mg, 17% DV
  • Sodium:​ 240 mg, 10% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 63 g, 23% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 1 g, 4% DV
    • Sugar:​ 62 g
  • Protein:​ 6 g, 12% DV
  • Caffeine:​ 70 mg

This drink is very customizable: You can add whipped cream, use a wide range of dairy and non-dairy milks and adjust the number of pumps of syrup and scoops of matcha tea powder. Changing any of these elements will also adjust the nutritional value of the beverage.

In terms of calories, a frappuccino is very similar to a milkshake. An 18-ounce milkshake (just slightly larger than a grande frappuccino) from one popular ice cream franchise has 458 calories, per the USDA.

Summary

While different brands and blends vary, single servings of most types of regular coffee (without any cream or sugar added) have approximately:

  • 2-4 calories
  • 0 g fat
  • 0 g carbs
  • 0 g sugar
  • 0 g protein
  • 95 to 155 mg caffeine

Calories in Tea and Nutrition Info

While water is the most commonly consumed beverage in the world, tea comes next, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Along with potential health benefits, some forms of tea serve as a wake-me-up beverage in the morning or during an afternoon energy dip, while herbal and caffeine-free options can be soothing throughout the day.

Brewing it up is simple: Hot water is poured over the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant or over dried flowers, roots and leaves (in the case of herbal teas), per Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

And when it's steeped on its own without any sweetener or milk, tea is virtually calorie-free. Take a look at the calories and nutritional information for your average 8-ounce cup of regular tea, without anything added to the cup, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 2
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 0 g
    • Added sugar:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Potassium:​ 87.7 mg, 2% DV

Keep scrolling to review the calorie counts and nutrition facts for several common tea brands and varieties.

Green, Black, Oolong and White Teas

That single plant — the Camellia sinensis — can be used to make several different types of tea, such as black tea, green tea, yerba mate, oolong tea and white tea.

These teas are all caffeinated, and can be prepared from tea bags or loose leaves. (Yerba mate is an exception: For this green tea, the leaves are ground into a powder.)

Take a look at the caffeine levels, calories and nutrition facts for all of these types of tea:

  • Black tea:​ The nutrition facts and calories for black tea are listed above. This virtually calorie-free beverage contains about 48 mg of caffeine in 8 oz., per the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
  • Green tea:​ An 8-oz. cup of green tea has 0 calories, a tiny amount of sodium (1% DV) and small amounts of potassium (1% DV) and phosphorus (5% DV), according to the USDA. Green tea is lower in caffeine than black tea, with 29 mg. in an 8-oz. cup, per the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
  • Yerba mate:​ This tea has no calories, per the USDA, but note that because it has a bitter taste, sugar is often added. Yerba mate tea has nearly as much caffeine in a cup as coffee, per a frequently cited October 2007 review in the Journal of Food Science.
  • White tea:​ Compared to other types of tea derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, white tea is low in caffeine, per Penn Medicine. This tea is also calorie-free, according to the USDA.
  • Oolong tea:​ This tea is made from leaves that are dried and partially fermented, per the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Like white tea, oolong tea does not have any calories, according to the USDA. It has 29 mg. of caffeine per 8-oz. cup, according to the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Adding Sugar

For any of these teas, stirring in sugar will change the nutrition facts. Add a one-serving packet (3 g) of sugar to your cup, and the beverage will have 11 calories, 2.8 g (1% DV) of carbohydrates and 2.8 g of sugar (6% DV), per the USDA.

Herbal Teas

Unlike black, oolong, white, green and yerba mate teas, herbal teas do not derive from the Camellia sinensis plant. Instead, they're made from brewing roots, flowers and leaves of other plants (think: peppermint, chamomile and more), according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Nearly all herbal teas do not contain caffeine.

Chamomile Tea

In ancient times, chamomile tea, which is brewed using the plant's flowers, was used medicinally, according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). There are two types of this plant: German chamomile and Roman chamomile, per the NCCIH.

More research is needed into the health effects of chamomile, per the NCCIH. It's often thought to help with stress and improve sleep, according to Penn Medicine. While there are rarely side effects associated with this tea, an allergic reaction is more common if you have allergies to plants such as ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds or daisies, per the NCCIH. As with many herbal teas, there's a lack of data regarding if chamomile tea is safe to drink during pregnancy or while breastfeeding, per the American Pregnancy Association.

Chamomile can potentially be helpful for people with asthma, per the Ohio State University College of Medicine, but it can also be harmful, per Mount Sinai. Consult your doctor if you have questions or concerns.

Take a look at the calories and nutrition facts for an 8-ounce cup of chamomile tea, according to the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 2
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Dietary fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Sugar:​ 0 g
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Iron​: 0.2 mg, 1% DV
  • Calcium​ 4.7 mg, 0% DV
  • Potassium:​ 21.3 mg, 0% DV

Chamomile tea does not have caffeine.

Tea Brands

There are many brands of tea available, and tea drinkers often display great loyalty to their brand of choice. Take a look at some of the most popular tea brands out there, including hot and iced tea.

Tetley Tea

Tetley offers many types of tea — black, green and herbal — with the typical nutrition information as detailed above. Tetley Tea has caffeine, although decaffeinated varieties are also available. They also sell tea bags designed for making iced tea.

Gold Peak Tea

Gold Peak makes bottled iced tea, which is available in many different flavors, such as unsweetened, sweet, green tea, raspberry tea and more. Gold Peak is manufactured by Coca-Cola. The nutrition facts vary from one tea flavor to the next.

A bottle of the unsweetened tea, for instance, has zero calories, according to Gold Peak. But an 18.5-ounce bottle of the brand's Georgia Peach Tea has the following calories and nutrition facts:

  • Calories:​ 170
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 30 mg, 1% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 45 g, 16% DV
    • Total Sugars:​ 45 g
    • Added Sugars:​ 45 g, 90% DV
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Caffeine:​ 30 mg

Lipton Iced Tea

When it comes to tea in the United States, Lipton is one of the most recognized brands available. Along with making black, green and herbal teas — which are available as tea bags and K-Cups — Lipton also makes bottled iced tea and iced tea mix.

A 20-ounce bottle of Lipton Peach Iced Tea has the following calories and nutrition facts, per the USDA:

  • Calories:​ 114
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Saturated Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Trans Fat:​ 0 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 222 mg, 9% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 30.1 g, 10% DV
    • Dietary Fiber:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Total Sugars:​ 29.9 g
    • Added Sugars:​ 0g, 0% DV
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV

Lipton Unsweetened Iced Tea Mix has zero calories, according to the USDA.

Arizona Good Brew All Natural Sweet Tea

Arizona has several types of iced tea available, including sweet and unsweet varieties. The calories and nutrition facts for an 8-ounce serving of Arizona Good Brew All Natural Sweet Tea are:

  • Calories:​ 70
  • Total Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 10 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrates:​ 19 g, 6% DV
    • Total Sugars:​ 18 g
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV

Summary

A single serving of most types of regular tea (without any milk or sugar added) has approximately:

  • 2 calories
  • 0 g fat
  • 0 g carbs
  • 0 g sugar
  • 0 g protein
  • 0 to 48 mg caffeine

Calories in Creamers and Nutrition Information

As you've gathered, adding milk or cream to your coffee or tea makes a big difference to the beverage's nutritional value. This table shows the calories and nutrition facts for 1 fluid ounce (2 tablespoons) of a wide range of milk options, according to the USDA:

Calories

Fat

Cholesterol

Sodium

Carbs

Sugars

Protein

Half and Half Cream

40

3.5 g; 5% DV

10.6 mg, 4% DV

18.4 mg, 1% DV

1.3 g, 0% DV

1.2 g, 2% DV

0.9 g, 2% DV

Whole Milk

19

1 g, 2% DV

3.1 mg, 1% DV

13.1 mg, 1% DV

1.5 g, 0% DV

1.5 g, 3% DV

1 g, 2% DV

2 Percent Milk

15

0.6 g, 1% DV

2.4 mg, 1% DV

14.3 mg, 1% DV

1.5 g, 0% DV

1.5 g, 3% DV

1 g, 2% DV

1 Percent Milk

13

0.3 g, 0% DV

1.5 mg, 1% DV

13.4 mg, 1% DV

1.5 g, 1% DV

1.6 g, 3% DV

1 g, 2% DV

Skim Milk

10

0 g, 0% DV

0.6 mg, 0% DV

12.9 mg, 1% DV

1.5 g, 1% DV

1.6 g, 3% DV

1 g, 2% DV

Source: USDA

Coffee Mate Creamer

Along with regular milk, there are many tempting creamers available. These are often available in both powder or liquid form. Look for creamer in your local supermarket, and you'll find many options, from standard flavors associated with coffee (think: hazelnut, pumpkin spice, French vanilla and so on) to more whimsical options (birthday cake, Snickers and other dessert-like varieties).

Corn syrup or sugar is typically one of the top ingredients in these sweet coffee add-ins. Vegetable oil, flavorings and anti-caking agents are also typically on the ingredient list.

Take a look at the calories and nutrition facts for a 15 milliliter serving (that's roughly 1 tablespoon) of Coffee Mate Original Coffee Creamer:

  • Calories:​ 20
  • Total Fat:​ 1 g, 1% DV
    • Saturated Fat:​ 0 g, 0% DV
    • Trans Fat:​ 0 g
    • Polyunsaturated Fat:​ 0 g
    • Monounsaturated Fat:​ 1 g
  • Cholesterol:​ 0 mg, 0% DV
  • Sodium:​ 5 mg, 0% DV
  • Total Carbohydrate:​ 2 g, 1% DV
    • Total Sugars:​ 1 g
    • Added Sugars:​ 1 g, 2% DV
  • Protein:​ 0 g, 0% DV

Other Coffee Mate varieties have more calories, such as the Funfetti creamer and Pumpkin Spice, which each clock in at 35 calories per tablespoon. Coffee Mate also has several sugar-free varieties available. Coffee Mate is prepared by the manufacturer and requires no preparation beyond pouring it into the cup.

Summary

Adding milk or creamer to your cup of coffee or tea significantly alters the calories and nutrition facts of your beverage. There’s a big difference between adding skim milk and a packaged, flavored creamer, too. A single serving (of about 1 to 2 tablespoons) of milk or creamer has approximately:

  • 10 to 40 calories
  • 0 to 3.5 g fat
  • 1.5 to 2 g carbs
  • 1.2 to 1.6 g sugar, including 0 to 5 g added sugars
  • 0 to 1 g protein
references