Butt Dimples Exercise

Butt Dimples Exercise
Butt Dimples Exercise (Image: UberImages/iStock/GettyImages)

Right where the lower back meets the glutes, some people have two small indentations, which might be called butt dimples. They're also called dimples of Venus, named after the Roman goddess of fertility. While you can make these dimples more visible through exercise, some people simply don't have them.

Anatomy of Butt Dimples

The bottom of your spine is called your lumbar spine — that's the thickest and sturdiest part. As you go lower there is another section, called the sacrum. The sacrum attaches your spine to your hip bones on the left and right side. Right where your lumbar spine and sacrum meet is around the middle of the butt dimple area. Each butt dimple is to the left or right of the spot, between the hip bone and the center of the spine.

Some medical professionals actually use butt dimples to see where someone's L5-S1 joint is. However, it's not an extremely reliable marker. A 2014 study in Arthritis and Rheumatology found that they could only find the dimples of Venus in about 40 percent of the test subjects.

The truth is that not everyone is built to have butt dimples. It has to do with the spacing between your hip bones, spine, and sacrum. There has to be enough room to leave a gap for the indent. However, you can try to develop the muscles around it and decrease your body fat to make it stand out as much as possible.

Fat-Loss Basics

When you shed body fat, it makes all of the little nooks and crannies in your body more visible. Your muscles look very defined and so do your back dimples. By losing fat ,you can accentuate the dimples of Venus but you can't create them.

To lose fat, you should start by trying to eat fewer calories. You can calculate how many calories you should be eating to lose weight using this calorie tracker.

Exercise is also important to burn calories. Try to get at least 30 minutes to an hour of activity every day, whether that be jogging, lifting weights or riding a bike.

Deadlift

To develop your lower back muscles and butt, the muscles that surround your butt dimples, start with the deadlift. It works all of the important muscle groups to make the dimples stand out.

How-to: Put a barbell on the floor. Walk up to the center of the barbell with your shins an inch away from it. Stick your butt back and bend over to grab the barbell with your hands wider than shoulder-width apart.

Put your weight back in your heels, stick your butt out, flatten your back and pull the weight up. Keep your chest out and shoulders back as you pull. Finish at the top by thrusting your hips forward and standing tall, and then put the weight back down.

Woman Lifting Heavy Barbell in CrossFit Gym
Deadlifts work the muscles around the butt dimple. (Image: SeventyFour/iStock/GettyImages)

Back Hyperextension

This simple machine forces you to isolate your lower back muscles, as well as use a little bit of your glutes, two of the most important muscle groups for the dimples of Venus.

How-to: Get into a back hyperextension machine and plant your feet flat against the platform. Put your thighs over the thigh pad. Lean forward with your upper body as far as you can, then lift your torso up as high as possible until your entire body is in a straight line. Lower yourself back down and repeat.

Prone Back Extensions

If you don't have a back hyperextension machine, try this alternative.

Read More: Lie on the ground on your stomach. Put your arms by your sides and keep your legs out straight behind you. Arch your chest up and look up, without moving any other part of your body. You should feel your lower back engage. Do 10 to 15 repetitions.

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