All About the Nutrition and Calories in Greek Yogurt

Top your Greek yogurt with fresh fruit, honey and granola for an easy and tasty snack.
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Creamy and high in protein, Greek yogurt is a tasty alternative to the traditional variety of yogurt that has lined supermarket shelves for years.

The Greek variety of this dairy snack is thicker than traditional yogurt, thanks to a liquid whey-straining process during manufacturing.

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Greek Yogurt Calories and Nutrition

Whole-Milk Greek Yogurt

A half-cup of plain, whole-milk Greek yogurt contains the following, according to the USDA:

  • Calories: 110
  • Total fat: 5.7 g
    • Saturated fat: 2.7 g
    • Trans fat: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 14.7 mg
  • Sodium: 39.7 mg
  • Total carbohydrates: 4.5 g
    • Fiber: 0 g
    • Sugar: 4.5 g
  • Protein: 10.2 g

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About 37 percent of the calories in Greek yogurt come from protein while 46 percent of the calories come from fat.

Non-Fat Greek Yogurt

A half-cup of plain, non-fat Greek yogurt contains the following, according to the USDA:

  • Calories: 67
  • Total fat: 0.4 g
    • Saturated fat: 0.1 g
    • Trans fat: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 5.7 mg
  • Sodium: 40.8 mg
  • Total carbohydrates: 4.1 g
    • Fiber: 0 g
    • Sugar: 3.7 g
  • Protein: 11.6 g

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About 69 percent of the calories in fat-free Greek yogurt come from protein while 7 percent of the calories come from fat.

Tip

Compared to plain fat-free Greek yogurt, flavored varieties can be higher in calories and carbohydrates if they contain added sugars.

Is Greek Yogurt Good for You?

Yes. Both full-fat and non-fat Greek yogurt are healthy options, however, you'll want to limit the amount of full-fat yogurt you eat in order to cut down on saturated fat.

The health benefits of non-fat Greek yogurt include protein, which helps keep you full, being low in calories (which deems it weight loss- or weight management-friendly) and providing gut-healthy probiotics.

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What's more, Greek yogurt seems to be a good alternative for people with lactose intolerance, a condition where one is unable to tolerate lactose, a type of sugar found in milk and some dairy products. Greek yogurt has a lower lactose content than regular yogurt, according to The Dairy Alliance.

When you can, opt for plain Greek yogurt and top it with frozen or fresh fruit, seeds, nuts, coconut chips and any other healthy toppings for flavor to avoid added sugar.

Easy Ways to Use Greek Yogurt

  • You can use plain, fat-free Greek yogurt as a substitute for full-fat sour cream or cream to make dips and salad dressings higher in protein and lower in calories.
  • You might also want to use it as a substitute for full-fat ingredients in such dishes as tzatziki, butternut squash soup, creamed spinach or smoothies.
  • Try blending fat-free Greek yogurt with mashed cauliflower for a healthier and lower-carbohydrate alternative to traditional mashed potatoes with butter.

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