Are Corn Nuts Healthy?

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Corn nuts are kernels of corn that have been fried in oil.
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To keep hunger at bay between meals, you might need a healthy snack to keep you satisfied. With some heart-healthy fat, protein and fiber, corn nuts do meet some of the criteria for a healthy choice. However, corn nuts are high in calories, which might put you over your limit if you are watching your weight.

Fat

Corn nuts are relatively high in fat, with 8 g of fat per 48 g, fulfilling 12 percent of the daily value. Of this fat, only 1 g is saturated and the rest is the healthy, unsaturated fat. Unsaturated fats may lower levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association. However, given that corn nuts are high in fat, they are also rich in calories, with 210 per 48 g.

Protein

Having a snack rich in protein delays the emptying of food from the stomach and keeps you feeling satisfied after eating. Corn nuts contain some protein, with 4 g of protein per 48 g or 1/4 cup of corn nuts. This is not as high as some other snacks, such as peanuts, which contain more than 7 g in just 28 g of nuts. If you're watching your weight, go for high-protein snacks such as low-fat yogurt.

Carbohydrates

Corn nuts are a good source of carbohydrates with 34 g per 48 g. Corn nuts provide 4 g of fiber in a 48 g serving, fulfilling 16 percent of the daily value based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Like protein, fiber holds food in the stomach for a long period, keeping you satisfied between meals. Fiber is also essential for digestion, and helps to speed food along through the intestines.

Vitamins and Minerals

Vitamins and minerals are not abundant in corn nuts. A 48 g serving does provide 4 percent of the daily value for iron, which is needed for oxygen transport. Apart from iron, a 48 g serving of corn nuts have 310 mg of sodium, fulfilling 13 percent of the daily value based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Sodium in excess is associated with high blood pressure and an increased risk of heart disease, so minimize it in your diet.

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