How to Cook Pork Steak on a Propane Grill

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Cook pork steaks that are about 1-inch thick for 8 minutes per side, over medium heat, on a propane grill.
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Pork steaks, or blade steaks, are flavorful cuts that benefit from quick-cooking methods such as the grill. Grilled pork steaks make a fabulous change of pace for your next barbecue.

Tip

Cook pork steaks that are about 1-inch thick for eight minutes per side over medium heat on a propane grill. Brine before for an extra-juicy bite.

About Pork Steaks

Pork steaks come from a cut that's known as the pork shoulder or Boston butt. This cut is often used for roasts or sausage making. When cut into steaks, the meat is perfect for the grill.

To create pork steaks, the butcher slices this roast, leaving the blade bone in the cut. Look for steaks that are about 1 inch thick. These are hearty enough to stay juicy and tender when subjected to the high temperatures of grilling.

Pork steaks contain ample fat marbling, which makes them flavorful and tender. As the steak cooks, the fat melts to baste the meat. They're a staple in the Midwest and in St. Louis-style barbecue.

As with pork chops, overcooking pork steaks can cause them to be dry and chewy. Cook them just until they reach an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit. This temperature is recommended by the USDA to prevent foodborne illness.

The 145 F recommendation assumes that you'll allow the steaks to rest at least three minutes after coming off the heat. During this rest, your steaks' temperatures rise a bit more. Resting allows the juices of the meat to distribute completely as well, ensuring that each bite is delicious and tender.

Grilled Pork Steaks

Chefs and backyard barbecuers are very particular about their pork steak recipes. One method is to simply set the steaks on a medium-hot grill and allow them to cook for about eight minutes per side or until they reach 145 F. Slather them with sauce for just the last couple of minutes of cooking, as adding sauce too early will likely to cause burning.

For extra-juicy steaks with a smoky flavor and seared outside, a more time-intensive propane grill cooking method is in order. You will need to have two areas of heat on your grill to cook your pork steak.

If your propane grill has two sides with separate heat settings, set one at a relatively low heat — about 250 F. The other side of the grill is set at a high heat suitable for searing.

Read more: Is Pork Better Than Beef?

Season the steaks generously with salt and pepper. Place the steaks on the low-heat side of the grill and cook for about one hour or until the internal temperature reaches 145 F. Once the meat is cooked through, move the steaks to the hot side of the grill for just a few minutes, per side, to achieve a delectable char on the outside.

When subjected to high heat, the proteins in the pork caramelize and create a flavorful crust. Brush on any barbecue sauce only during the last minute of cooking to avoid burning and flare-ups.

Pork Steak Brine

Grilled pork steaks are vulnerable to drying out and becoming tough. A pork steak brine adds moisture and helps add flavor to the meat that penetrates to the bone.

A plain salt water solution is always an option. A classic solution is composed of 1/4 cup salt to every 6 cups of water, according to the JWU College of Culinary Arts. You may also add a little brown sugar, molasses, bay leaves and black pepper for additional flavor.

Read more: How to Make Oven-Baked Boneless Pork Chops

Brine for at least four hours. This gives the meat time to soak up the flavor. The cells in the pork absorb some of the water, making the steak more likely to stay juicy and tender, even if slightly overcooked on the grill. Pat steaks dry before placing them on the grill.

Another way to add more flavor to your pork steaks is by adding a dry rub instead of just salt and pepper. Optional ingredients for a dry rub include salt, pepper, paprika, dried sage and rosemary. Press this dry rub on just before putting the steaks on the low-heat grill.

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