Is V8 Low Sodium Good for You?

Health experts recommend eating at least two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables daily for good reason. These foods are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and phytonutrients that support mental and physical well-being. Yet, only one in 10 adults meets these recommendations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This can lead to nutrient deficiencies and chronic illnesses. One way to increase your intake of fruits and veggies is to drink natural juices. V8 Low Sodium juice, for example, contains the juice of two servings of vegetables.

Is V8 Low Sodium Good for You? (Image: alicjane/iStock/GettyImages)

Tip

Even though V8 Low Sodium cannot replace whole foods, it makes a healthy addition to most diets. It's low in calories and boasts large amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium.

What Is V8 Low Sodium?

This low-sodium vegetable juice has emerged as a popular choice among dieters and health-conscious customers. One glass of low-sodium V8 is the equivalent of eight veggies, including:

  • Tomato puree
  • Spinach
  • Watercress
  • Beets
  • Celery
  • Lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Carrots

These vegetables are grown and processed in the U.S. V8 Low Sodium also contains citric acid, beta-carotene, vitamin C, potassium chloride, natural flavors and a small amount of salt. According to the manufacturer, this beverage is free of GMOs, artificial colors, preservatives and added sugar. The juice bottle and packaging contain no bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that's been linked to metabolic and endocrine disorders, such as breast and prostate cancer, infertility and hormonal imbalances.

V8 Juice Nutrition Facts

V8 Low Sodium provides 120 percent of the RDA of vitamin C, 40 percent of the RDA of vitamin A, 2 percent of the RDA of iron and 2 percent of the RDA of calcium, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. It also delivers 2 grams of protein and 10 grams of carbs, including 2 grams of fiber and 7 grams of sugars. One serving has 50 calories and no fat.

Compared to the original V8, which contains 640 milligrams of sodium, this version has only 140 milligrams of sodium. This makes it suitable for those struggling with high blood pressure or fluid retention.

According to a 2017 review published by Cochrane, switching to a low-sodium diet may help reduce blood pressure in people with hypertension. The American Heart Association recommends cutting back on salt as a way to prevent and manage high blood pressure. Currently, the maximum limit for most adults, especially those with hypertension, is 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day and 2,300 milligrams for healthy individuals.

With only 50 calories per serving, V8 fits into any diet. Plus, it boasts 900 milligrams of potassium, leading to improved cardiovascular health. This mineral supports normal cell function, regulates blood pressure and protects against stroke, as noted by the National Institutes of Health. Nine hundred milligrams represent approximately 26 percent of the daily recommended intake for a healthy adult. People with inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s, as well as those taking diuretics and laxatives, require larger amounts of potassium in their diet.

Is V8 Really Healthy?

This low-sodium vegetable juice makes it easier to increase your nutrient intake, especially if you're not eating enough veggies. Vitamin C, one of its most abundant nutrients, plays a key role in collagen synthesis, protein metabolism and immune function. It also accelerates wound healing and fights oxidative stress.

In a 2015 clinical trial published in the Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, subjects who received 500 milligrams of vitamin C per day for two weeks experienced lower anxiety levels. Research suggests that this nutrient may also improve academic performance. Another study published in the Nutrition Journal in 2013 has found that vitamin C may relieve depression symptoms to a greater extent than fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed anti-depressant drug with potential side effects.

V8 Low Sodium also boasts nearly half of the daily recommended allowance of vitamin A. This antioxidant supports kidney, lung and heart function, promotes eye health and fights free radical damage. According to a 2014 study published in the International Journal of Clinical Oncology, vitamin A (beta-carotene) and other antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables may protect against colon cancer.

Despite its potential health benefits, V8 cannot replace real food. In the debate over V8 vs. vegetables, whole foods win the prize for providing the most nutrition largely due to their fiber content. This low-sodium vegetable juice contains just 2 grams of fiber per serving. A single cup of beets, by comparison, delivers 3.8 grams of fiber.

However, V8 Low Sodium is a healthy addition to most diets. It's free of chemicals and provides large doses of certain vitamins and minerals.

A diet rich in fruits and vegetables may decrease your risk of chronic diseases, protect against cancer and maintain gut health. Furthermore, these foods have been linked to lower triglycerides and cholesterol levels, decreased blood pressure and reduced heart disease risk. If you're trying to lose a few pounds, swapping soda and other sugar-laden beverages with V8 can help you slim down and improve your eating habits.

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