How to Get Liver Enzymes Back to Normal Levels

A number of medical conditions, medications and lifestyle choices can lead to elevated liver enzymes. Heavy drinking, hepatitis and obesity are very common causes. You might also suffer from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a heavy accumulation of fat in the liver. Your doctor can help uncover the cause of the high enzyme levels and recommend the appropriate treatment.

Step 1

Take any prescription medication your doctor gives you. If you're suffering from a gallbladder infection or inflammation, hypothyroidism, mononucleosis, pancreatitis or other medical problem, your doctor might prescribe antibiotics or anti-inflammatories to help resolve the problem.

Step 2

Stop smoking and drinking or reduce these to a minimum. Both alcohol and tobacco contain toxins that are bad for the liver, especially when your liver enzymes are already elevated. Alcohol can also increase fat accumulation in the liver.

Step 3

Reduce your calorie intake if you're overweight. According to the Hepatitis Foundation International, an excess of calories, especially in the form of carbohydrates, can actually worsen your liver enzyme levels by increasing fat deposits. Eliminate sweets, baked goods and cookies and cakes first. Instead, concentrate on healthier foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables and lean proteins.

Step 4

Take milk thistle supplements. Although scientific results are mixed, the herb milk thistle shows promising results in the treatment of viral hepatitis and liver disease, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Take capsules as indicated on the label, since quantities vary among brands.

REFERENCES & RESOURCES
Load Comments
PARTNER & LICENSEE OF THE LIVESTRONG FOUNDATION

Copyright © 2019 Leaf Group Ltd. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the LIVESTRONG.COM Terms of Use , Privacy Policy and Copyright Policy . The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies.