What Is the Difference Between D-Biotin and Biotin?

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Organic rainbow chard thriving in the garden. (Image: Shane Folkertsma/iStock/Getty Images)

D-biotin is the naturally occurring, biologically active form of the B vitamin biotin. It's involved in lipid, protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Because biotin is relatively plentiful among foods and your intestines are even able to produce it, a deficiency is rare and supplements are usually unnecessary unless your doctor recommends them. Foods rich in biotin include eggs, dairy products, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, wheat bran, whole-wheat bread, wild salmon, Swiss chard, cauliflower, avocados and raspberries.

D-Biotin Versus Biotin

D-biotin is one of eight forms of the water-soluble vitamin, biotin, also known as vitamin B-7. It is a coenzyme -- or helper enzyme -- for numerous metabolic reactions in the body. D-biotin is involved in lipid and protein metabolism and helps convert food into glucose, which the body uses for energy. It's also vital for maintaining skin, hair and mucous membranes

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