Grapefruit and Apple Cider Vinegar Combo Diet

Apple cider vinegar and grapefruit juice has been touted as a weight loss elixir. But does it really work? Research shows that traditional weight loss methods are not only healthier, but more effective.

Grapefruit doesn't provide all the nutrients necessary for good health. Credit: Ilona Shorokhova/iStock/GettyImages

Apple Cider Vinegar and Juice

Click through the internet and you'll find a number of apple cider vinegar and grapefruit juice recipes for weight loss, along with recipe reviews (e.g., grapefruit juice, apple cider and honey reviews; orange juice, apple cider vinegar and honey drink reviews).

Despite the proliferation of fad diet information, there's very little evidence they'll give you the weight loss results you desire. In fact, they may precipitate negative consequences. That's right — ingesting apple cider vinegar on a regular basis can be detrimental for your health.

As a general matter, juice cleanses are not the recommended weight loss method. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, cleanses paired with fasting can have dangerous effects, such as dehydration, weakness and headaches. They're especially risky for those with kidney disease or diabetes.

Read more: The Effects of Eating Too Much Grapefruit

In a small July 2012 study published in the journal Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 74 participants were given the control diet or a grapefruit diet, three times daily for six weeks.

The researchers found that grapefruit consumption was associated with modest weight loss and significant reduction in blood pressure. Decreases in weight loss weren't significant, though improvement in blood pressure and lipids show that grapefruit consumption can be further evaluated for obesity or cardiovascular disease prevention.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has been around for centuries and thought to have several health benefits and uses, such as killing bacteria. Nowadays, according to Penn Medicine, it has been touted as a weight loss potion. But does it actually work?

There are few or no studies that support claims that apple cider vinegar aids in weight loss. In fact, consuming too much apple cider vinegar or apple cider vinegar that is not diluted may be dangerous, as it can damage your tooth enamel or esophagus lining due to its high acidity levels. It may also interact with certain drugs, such as insulin or diuretics, which can contribute to low potassium levels, explains Mayo Clinic.

Read more: The Powers of Apple Cider Vinegar Have Been Vastly Overestimated

There are also claims that apple cider vinegar pills aid in weight loss, but again, there's no evidence that indicates this is true. It's also important to be wary of whether the diet supplement contains what's being advertised.

Despite its risks, apple cider vinegar is OK to use in small quantities, especially on salads and vegetables or in sauces. Though the liquid itself doesn't induce weight loss, it can replace less healthy sauces or spices, such as salt.

Healthy Ways to Lose Weight

If you're hoping to lose weight, there are several healthy approaches you can incorporate into your daily routine:

  • Johns Hopkins Medicine recommends picking a healthy eating plan and sticking to it. In general, a low-carb diet will help you avoid unhealthy food and drinks, such as bagels and soda.
  • Physical activity is also suggested by Johns Hopkins Medicine as a healthy way to shed pounds. Strength training is also advisable, as it helps build lean muscle mass.
  • The bottom line, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is that to lose weight, you have to eat fewer calories than your body uses or create what's called a calorie deficit. This doesn't necessarily mean eating less food. Rather you can replace food with lower-carb alternatives and try exercising on a regular basis.

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