Four-Egg Omelet Nutrition Information

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Knowing the calories of a four-egg omelet, along with the essential omelette nutrition, is vital when figuring out the number of nutrients you need on a daily basis.
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Knowing the calories in a four-egg omelet, along with the essential omelette nutrition, is vital when figuring out the levels of nutrients you need on a daily basis. Adding vegetables to your omelet will increase the number of calories, as well as the amount of macronutrients, vitamins and minerals.

Four-Egg Omelette Nutrition Facts

According to the USDA, an egg omelet with one large egg has 93.9 calories. With four eggs, the calories increase to 375.6 calories, or 19 percent of the recommended daily individual caloric intake. A four-egg omelet's protein count is 25.8 grams, or 52 percent of the daily value of protein, while 28.44 grams (44 percent of the daily value) is fat. Just 1.56 grams are carbohydrates (1 percent of the daily value).

Read more: Nutrition Facts for One Egg

Adding vegetables to your omelet will increase its caloric content. The calories in an omelette with vegetables number about 464, with 29.44 grams of protein, 34.88 grams of fat and 8 grams of carbohydrates.

The breakdown of the three important macronutrients is 70 percent for fat, 28 percent for egg omelet protein and just 2 percent for carbohydrates. The cholesterol in a four-egg omelet is 763.7 milligrams, 255 percent of the daily value.

According to a small study of 38 individuals published in the March 2017 issue of Lipids, eating eggs on a daily basis results in an increase in the levels of "good" HDL cholesterol and a decrease in the levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol. A diet rich in good cholesterol may even help the body by preventing the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, like clogged arteries and heart disease, explains Harvard Health Publishing.

Read more: 7 Reasons to Crack an Egg for Breakfast

Moderation is key for health. A four-egg omelet is relatively high in saturated fat, contributing 40 percent of the daily value of an individual's calories. The American Heart Association states that reducing the intake of saturated fats, to just 5 to 6 percent of the overall daily calories, will help in reducing the amount of LDL cholesterol in the body.

Omelette Nutrition Benefits

Four-egg omelette nutrition includes a number of important vitamins and minerals required by the body for maintaining muscle function, healthy skin and the immune system. According to the USDA, the key minerals that four-egg omelettes contain include:

  • Calcium: Providing 117.1 milligrams, or 9 percent of the daily value, of a key mineral necessary for muscle contraction and bone growth.

  • Iron: A four-egg omelet has 3.6 milligrams, or 20 percent of the daily value, of iron, an important part of hemoglobin in the blood.

  • Potassium and Sodium: These minerals help in muscle contraction and cell functioning, and an omelet offers approximately 285.5 milligrams (16 percent of the daily value) of potassium and 378.2 milligrams (16 percent of the daily value) of sodium.

  • Zinc: An essential micronutrient for the body, a diet rich in zinc helps over 300 enzyme reactions to take place. A four-egg omelet typically provides 2.7 milligrams (24 percent of the daily value) of zinc.

Read more: Are Egg Whites Healthy?

A four-egg omelet also provides key vitamins that are necessary for the body's energy supply and immune system. These include:

  • 47 percent of the daily value of Vitamin A, an important vitamin required for vision and bone growth.

  • 77 percent of the daily value of vitamin B12. A November 2013 clinical trial published in the_ Open Neurology Journal_ indicated that supplementing vitamin B12 helped improve the symptoms of depression.

  • 21 percent of the daily value of vitamin D. According to Harvard Health Publishing, vitamin D helps in bone growth and health by promoting the absorption of calcium from the intestine.

  • 21 percent of the daily value of vitamin E, a fat-soluble antioxidant that prevents the formation of free radicals and promotes the formation of collagen in the skin.

  • 9 percent of the daily value of vitamin K, which the Linus Pauling Institute's Micronutrient Information Center explains is necessary to prevent excessive bleeding by promoting the coagulation of blood.
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