The Daily Maximum Dose of Magnesium Oxide

Before you talk about the maximum dose of magnesium, you have to learn a little about magnesium itself. Magnesium is quite important for keeping you healthy.

Before you talk about the maximum dose of magnesium, you have to learn a little about magnesium itself. Credit: Dariia Chernenko/iStock/GettyImages

Despite this, people who follow a typical Western diet often don't get enough of it. A Western diet frequently lacks the necessary legumes and leafy green vegetables that are rich sources of magnesium and many other crucial nutrients, according to a September 2015 study published in Nutrients.

To add to this, having some conditions and diseases will also make you more likely to develop a deficiency of magnesium in your body. These include Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and alcoholism, according to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

Under such circumstances, it might be a good idea to take a magnesium supplement to increase the levels of magnesium in your body. This is especially necessary if you don't consume enough of it in your diet or have a condition that increases the risk of deficiency.

Different Types of Magnesium Supplements

Magnesium comes in the form of many different supplements, according to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

The most important thing to know before you decide which supplement to take is its absorption rate, which will tell you how well it is taken into your body. The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements states that the magnesium supplements that absorb more completely than others are the chloride, lactate, spartate and citrate forms.

The most common magnesium supplements, according to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, are magnesium oxide, magnesium chloride and magnesium citrate.

Read more: Can Magnesium Supplements Give You Gas?

Benefits of Magnesium Oxide

Magnesium oxide, just like the other supplements, has plenty of health benefits. When a magnesium oxide dosage is taken regularly, it can boost magnesium levels in the body, manage depression, relieve constipation and much more.

Gastrointestinal Issues: When mixed with water, magnesium oxide turns into magnesium hydroxide, which is quite effective at neutralizing the acids found in the stomach. In fact, many antacids have substances based on magnesium and hydrogen complexes as part of their ingredients. However, it is relatively unknown how effective magnesium oxide is on its own at battling gastrointestinal issues.

Depression: Magnesium oxide may be effective as a way to manage depressive behaviors and symptoms. It may reduce stress and have a positive impact on mental health.

Blood Pressure and Strokes: An October 2014 study published in Stroke notes that magnesium may be effective in reducing the risk of ischemic strokes. This is because such strokes are often caused by high blood pressure and magnesium lowers blood pressure.

Migraines: Magnesium oxide may reduce both the quantity and intensity of migraines, according to the study published in Stroke.

Read more: How Soon do You Feel the Benefits of Magnesium?

Maximum Dose of Magnesium

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for magnesium depends on your age, gender and whether you're pregnant or lactating. The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements notes the RDAs for magnesium.

Eighteen-year-old men 410 milligrams of magnesium and 18-year-old women need 360 milligrams. Eighteen-year-old pregnant women need 400 milligrams and women who are lactating need 360 milligrams.

Men ages 19 to 30 years need 400 milligrams. Women ages 19 to 30 years need 310 milligrams. Women in this age group who are pregnant need 350 milligrams, and those who are lactating need 310 milligrams.

Men ages 31 to 50 years need 420 milligrams, whereas women in this age group need 320 milligrams. Women in this age group who are pregnant need 360 milligrams, and women who are lactating need 320 milligrams.

Men ages 51 and older need 420 milligrams of magnesium, and women in this age group need 320 milligrams.

These are the maximum doses of magnesium, which depends on your age, gender and whether you are pregnant or lactating. Magnesium overdose is not likely to come from your diet. However, dietary supplements and medications have resulted in some overdose symptoms.

There are cases in which the recommended dosage might be higher than the recommended upper limit, such as when treating certain conditions and diseases. But you should only do this under the supervision of a doctor.

For example, people with diabetes may be allowed to take a higher dose of magnesium. A small July 2014 study involving 54 diabetic patients, published in the Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran, concluded that a proper dose of a magnesium supplement has beneficial effects on the patients' lipid profile, blood glucose and blood pressure.

Studies have shown that magnesium deficiency is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, according to May 2018 study published in Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease.

Magnesium Overdose Symptoms

Magnesium overdose symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramping and nausea, according to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Large doses of magnesium in antacids and laxatives that provide 5,000 milligrams or more per day have caused magnesium toxicity, which can result in death.

The most common side effect of magnesium overdose by far is diarrhea. Magnesium oxide is a magnesium salt, and magnesium salts are known to be very strong laxatives. The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements states that side effects of a magnesium overdose include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, signs of depression, hypotension, lethargy, facial flushing, urine retention and ileus.

From there, the symptoms will get worse by progressing to extreme hypotension, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, irregular heartbeat and, finally, cardiac arrest.

Discuss your magnesium supplementation with your primary care provider. If you are having symptoms of a magnesium overdose, seek immediate medical attention.

Michigan Medicine recommends you that seek immediate medical attention if you have an allergic reaction to a magnesium oxide supplement. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include swelling of your face, lips, throat or tongue, difficulty breathing and hives.

Michigan Medicine also recommends that you stop taking the supplement and seek immediate medical attention if you experience rectal bleeding, tarry or bloody stools, coughing up blood, vomit that looks like coffee grounds or no bowel movement.

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