How to Reheat Rotisserie Chicken With Rub

Slicing Rotisserie Chicken on cutting board
Don't let your reheated rotisserie chicken get dry and tough. (Image: AnnapolisStudios/iStock/GettyImages)

Rotisserie chicken can be added to just about any dish that calls for cooked chicken. That versatility is likely what lead to more than 625 million rotisserie chickens being sold in the U.S. in 2017, according to market-research firm Nielsen and Costco Wholesale Corp. And they continue to be a mainstay of many household dinners.

Most of these chickens are flavored with a rub that contains spices and sugars, such as barbecue or lemon-pepper and are often injected with a salt water solution to keep them moist.

Rotisserie chickens are inexpensive and versatile, but they dry out quickly if you reheat them the wrong way. If you have the time, reheat the chicken in the oven. In a pinch, you can microwave rotisserie chicken or heat it on the stovetop with other ingredients.

Reheating Rotisserie Chicken in an Oven

Reheat Rotisserie Chicken in the Oven

Things You'll Need

  • Rotisserie chicken

  • Baking sheet

  • Aluminum foil

  • Meat thermometer

  • Serving platter

  • Cutting board

  • Knife

Step 1: Preheat and Prep

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the whole rotisserie chicken from its packaging and place it on a baking sheet.

Step 2: Reheat Chicken for 25 Minutes

Cover the chicken with aluminum foil and place it in the oven. Bake for 25 minutes or until a meat thermometer inserted in the chicken registers 165 degrees Fahrenheit. The foil helps retain moisture, but if you want a crispy skin, leave the foil off, which will also accentuate the flavor of the rub.

Step 3: Let Rest Before Serving

Transfer the chicken to a serving platter and let it cool for five minutes before cutting it.

Reheating Rotisserie Chicken in a Microwave

Reheat Rotisserie Chicken in the Microwave

Things You'll Need

  • Rotisserie chicken

  • Microwave-safe dish

  • Wet paper towel

  • Meat thermometer

  • Serving dish

  • Chef's knife

Step 1: Separate Meat and Bones

Remove all of the meat from the bones and discard the bones and carcass. Place the meat in a microwave-safe dish and cover with a wet paper towel.

Step 2: Reheat Chicken One Minute at a Time

Heat the chicken in one-minute increments, turning the chicken after each minute to ensure even reheating. Dark meat contains more fat than white meat, so it may heat up faster. Continue to heat in one-minute intervals until all of the chicken is heated through to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 3: Let Rest Before Serving

Let cool before serving or add to your favorite dish (see below for more healthy meal ideas).

Reheating Rotisserie Chicken in a Saute Pan
Use a sautee pan to reheat rotisserie chicken. (Image: MSPhotographic/iStock/GettyImages)

Reheat Rotisserie Chicken in a Saute Pan

Things You'll Need

  • Rotisserie chicken

  • Saute pan

  • 1/2 cup chicken stock

  • Meat thermometer

  • Knife

Step 1: Remove Meat and Shred

Remove chicken from the bones and discard bones and carcass. Slice or shred chicken to desired size.

Step 2: Heat in Saute Pan

In a saute pan over medium heat, add one half cup of chicken stock. Add the chicken to the saute pan, cover and heat until the chicken is heated to the proper temperature (165 degrees Fahrenheit).

Step 3: Make It a Meal

Enjoy the chicken alone or add to your favorite dish!

Tips for Reheating Rotisserie Chicken

  • To speed up reheating time, remove chicken meat from the bones before storing and reheating.
  • When reheating a whole chicken, use the oven. For all other cooking methods, remove the meat from the bones first.
  • When storing chicken, it can be stored in the fridge for up to three days.
  • When freezing rotisserie chicken, make sure you remove all of the chicken from the bones before placing in freezer safe bags. Thaw frozen chicken in the refrigerator — not on the countertop — and then reheat.
  • Any method of heat can be used to reheat rotisserie chicken. Baking, sautéing, and microwaving are all good methods for reheating.
  • Be mindful of adding extra salt to dishes containing rotisserie chicken. They're already high in sodium, so a good rule of thumb would be to taste test as you cook.
  • Remove the skin right away if possible. The skin is easier to remove when the chicken is warm. There is no nutritional benefit to keeping the skin on the chicken, and it can, in fact, add lots of extra fat and calories.
  • Food safety is still important when reheating. All leftover chicken should be reheated to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Rotisserie chickens can be used in many foods that don't require reheating for even faster meals. Shred or dice the chicken and use it in pasta and green salads. Add Greek yogurt, cashews and grapes for an easy chicken salad.
Homemade Pulled Chicken Sandwich
Enjoy BBQ chicken sandwiches made with your rotisserie chicken leftovers. (Image: bhofack2/iStock/GettyImages)

How to Use Rotisserie Chicken Leftovers

Rotisserie chicken can be a timesaver when looking to get dinner on the table quickly. Many meals come together in 30 minutes or less when a rotisserie chicken is the main ingredient. Use rotisserie chicken in these recipe ideas below and increase the number of meals eaten at home each week.

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