How to Remove Moles Yourself With Castor Oil

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The castor plant produces a seed containing both a deadly poison and a beneficial oil. Castor oil is a popular alternative remedy for skin ailments, including the treatment of unwanted moles. The idea of removing moles with castor oil originated with Edgar Cayce, a reported sleeping prophet who suggested the treatment while in a trance. Although medical researchers have not tested and confirmed Cayce's claims, you may try to remove a mole with castor oil. Consult your doctor about any mole that changes shape, grows or has uneven edges.

Oil and Soda Method

Step 1

Combine just enough baking soda with three drops of castor oil to make a gummy paste, recommends the Meridian Institute, an organization for holistic research. The mixture should be slightly sticky.

Step 2

Dab the oil and soda mixture directly onto the mole, spreading it over the entire mole. Cayce suggested applying the mixture every other evening.

Step 3

Put an adhesive bandage on top to prevent the mixture from rubbing off. Bind the mole with gauze or a clean cloth if you don't have an adhesive bandage.

Step 4

Remove the bandage and wash off the mixture in the morning.

Oil-Only Method

Step 1

Rub castor oil directly on the mole. The Association for Research and Enlightenment (ARE), collects and shares Cayce's recommendations. ARE mentions a case study involving a dog with a suspicious mole.

Step 2

Massage the castor oil daily into the mole. In the case of the dog–the mole came to a head and drained before healing completely, according to the Cayce records.

Step 3

Repeat using castor oil indefinitely to treat moles and other skin disorders.

Things You'll Need

  • Castor Oil

  • Baking Soda

  • Adhesive bandage

Warning

Castor oil is safe for most people when used externally, but the Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine warns that those with a hypersensitivity to the castor bean should not use the oil. In addition, Gale reports that repeated use may result in skin irritation in some individuals.

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