Nutritional Facts of Barefoot Merlot Wine

Line of two wine glasses full of wine
A glass of Barefoot Merlot can fit into any diet. (Image: Cineberg/iStock/Getty Images)

Barefoot Wines were first introduced to California wine drinkers in 1965. It was not until the 1990s that Barefoot became a national brand praised for high quality wines at affordable prices, according to the winery's website. At the same time, Merlot wine was gaining popularity among wine drinkers, and Barefoot Merlot was no exception.

Merlot is a variety of wine that is very similar to Cabernet Sauvignon, except for its lower acidity and astringency, says the website cellarnotes.net. Even the most conscientious dieters can enjoy Barefoot Merlot once they understand some basic nutrition facts.

Calories

According to a Barefoot Wine representative, Barefoot Merlot has 24 calories per ounce. One serving of wine is defined as 5 fluid ounces. Therefore, each serving of Barefoot Merlot contains 120 calories.

Carbohydrates

Contributing to the total calories in Barefoot Merlot are carbohydrates. According to the manufacturers of Barefoot Merlot, there are 4.5 grams of carbohydrates in each 5 fluid ounce serving. Of these 4.5 grams, 1 gram is sugar.

Alcohol

The majority of calories in Barefoot Merlot come from alcohol. Alcohol contains 7 calories per gram. According to the Barefoot Merlot label, the wine is 13 percent alcohol by volume. This means there are 14.5 grams of alcohol per 5 fluid ounce serving. The alcohol in Barefoot Merlot contributes 102 of the 120 calories per serving.

Sodium

Barefoot Merlot contains very small amounts of sodium, however, to those monitoring their intake, every milligram counts. Each serving of wine contains 2mg of sodium. According to the USDA, the recommended daily allowance for sodium is 2000mg, so Barefoot Merlot meets the criterion for a “very low sodium food.”

Antioxidants

Red wine has been praised for its supply of antioxidants. Barefoot Merlot, and other red wines, contain flavinoids and nonflavinoids. The nonflavinoid, resveratrol, comes from the skin of Merlot and other red grapes, and has been linked with lowering “bad” cholesterol and preventing blood clots, according to the Mayo Clinic.

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