How Do Fighters Gain Weight After Weigh-Ins?

MMA fighters during a match
Two fighters are sparring. (Image: Antonio_Diaz/iStock/Getty Images)

Many combat sports are divided into separate weight classes to keep fights fair, as a size deficit between two skilled athletes can make a huge difference in terms of power and reach. However, many athletes choose to drop weight to reach a lower weight class, then put on more weight after the weigh-in to gain a weight advantage over an opponent.

Weight Classes

Most combat sports have a system of weight classes to ensure that fighters are matched against similar-size fighters. From wrestling to boxing, from kickboxing to mixed martial arts, weight classes are supposed to minimize weight and size advantages, as the additional size and power can give heavier fighters an advantage. Fighters are normally required to weigh in before a fight, either on the same day or, in some instances, a full day in advance.

Benefits of Cutting Weight

While some sports only allow for a small deviation in weight in each class, in others, such as mixed martial arts, there can be as much as 20 pounds difference between the top and bottom of a weight class. Consequently, being at the bottom end of a weight class has disadvantages. However, by losing weight, a fighter can go from being in the bottom end of a weight class to being at the top end of a lower weight division, putting him at an advantage.

Weight Cutting

Fighters lose weight in two main ways. The first method is to lose weight through diet and exercise, eating smaller portions and exercising more during the pre-fight training camp to lose weight over an extended period of time by shedding fat, or even muscle. The second method involves dehydrating yourself before the weigh-in, a process that can last anywhere from a day to a week depending on the severity of the weight cut. While dehydration can be dangerous and can affect your physical performance, many athletes who are used to cutting weight can cut and regain as much as 10 or 15 pounds of water weight after a weigh-in.

Putting on Weight

After a weigh-in, fighters will normally rehydrate by drinking a sports drink, as they need to replace electrolytes as well as the water they have lost. After extreme dehydration, small sips of fluid are better than large gulps, which can make you ill. Fluid replacement solutions such as those designed for diarrhea sufferers are also effective. Fighters can also begin eating to replace weight lost through dieting, focusing on carbohydrates to fuel the body for the upcoming fight.

REFERENCES & RESOURCES
Comments
PARTNER & LICENSEE OF THE LIVESTRONG FOUNDATION

Copyright © 2018 Leaf Group Ltd. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the LIVESTRONG.COM Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Copyright Policy. The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies.