Foods That Are Substitutes for Flaxseed Meal

Flaxseed, also known as linseed, is highly nutritious and commonly used as a thickener, binder or crust in vegan and vegetarian cooking. If you can't use flaxseed meal but want to cook with a similar product, there are several flax meal substitutes you can use.

Psyllium husk is a great substitute for flaxseed. Credit: canyonos/iStock/GettyImages

Read more: 13 Powerful Grains and Seeds

Flaxseed Nutrition Facts and Properties

Flaxseed is an incredibly nutrient-rich seed. According to the USDA, each ounce of flaxseed has 152 calories, 5.2 grams of protein and 8.2 grams of carbohydrates. Nearly all of these carbohydrates (7.8 grams) come from dietary fiber.

Each ounce of flaxseeds also contains 12 grams of fat — and fortunately, these fats are mostly healthy. An April 2015 study in the Journal of Food Science and Technology reported that 71.8 percent of the fats in flaxseed come from polyunsaturated fats, while 18.5 percent are monounsaturated and 10 percent are saturated.

In addition to these macronutrients, each ounce of flaxseed also has:

  • 6 percent of the daily value (DV) for calcium
  • 9 percent of the DV for iron
  • 5 percent of the DV for potassium
  • 27 percent of the DV for magnesium
  • 15 percent of the DV for phosphorus
  • 11 percent of the DV for zinc
  • 38 percent of the DV for copper
  • 31 percent of the DV manganese
  • 13 percent of the DV for selenium
  • 39 percent of the DV for thiamin (vitamin B1)
  • 5 percent of the DV for niacin (vitamin B3)
  • 6 percent of the DV for vitamin B5
  • 8 percent of the DV for vitamin B6
  • 6 percent of the DV for folic acid (vitamin B9)

Flaxseeds are also rich in lignans, lutein and zeaxanthin, and antioxidants like phenolic compounds. You can also find small amounts (between 1 and 4 percent) of B-complex vitamins, vitamin E, vitamin K and choline in each ounce of flaxseeds.

Flaxseed isn't only popular because of its impressive nutrition; it also has a variety of uses in the kitchen. When mixed with water, flaxseed meal can be used as a thickening agent or as an alternative to eggs. Toasted flax meal can also provide you with a nutty crust on fried foods or a coating on desserts. While flaxseed is perhaps most popular among vegans and vegetarians, you might it in anything from baked goods to chicken nuggets.

Read more: Secrets of 16 Strange and Popular Superfoods

Psyllium: A Fibrous Flax Substitute

If you're trying to find a flaxseed meal alternative for a recipe, you'll first need to ask yourself how the flaxseed is being used. For instance, if you're just looking for a binder or thickening agent, you could use xantham gum or guar gum as your flax meal substitute. However, if you're looking for foods that can provide some of the same nutritional benefits that flaxseed has, your options become more restricted.

Flaxseed is notably rich in fiber, which makes it particularly beneficial for your gastrointestinal tract. Psyllium seeds and husks, which are also rich in fiber, can work as a flaxseed meal replacement in this regard. According to a November 2018 study in the Journal of Food Process Engineering, psyllium seeds are 74 to 79 percent fiber, making them much richer in fiber than flaxseeds.

Although psyllium is best known for its ability to relieve gastrointestinal issues, it can also be ground into meal and used in cooking. Like ground flaxseed, psyllium can be used in gluten-free baking too. However, while it is a good flax meal substitute, if you're looking for fiber, it mainly contains trace elements and isn't nearly as nutrient-rich as flaxseed.

Hemp: A Protein-Rich Flaxseed Substitute

Hemp seeds are another commonly used flaxseed meal substitute. Hemp seeds have the most calories out of all flaxseed meal alternatives, as well as the most fat and protein — with 13.8 grams and 9 grams per ounce, respectively. They also have the lowest carbohydrates, which also means they have the least fiber. Each ounce of hemp seeds has just 1.1 grams of fiber and a total of 2.5 carbohydrates per ounce.

Hemp seeds are much more nutrient-rich than psyllium and are more similar to flaxseeds. According to the USDA, each ounce of hemp seeds contains:

  • 30 percent of the daily value (DV) for thiamin (vitamin B1)
  • 6 percent of the DV for riboflavin (vitamin B2)
  • 16 percent of the DV for niacin (vitamin B3)
  • 10 percent of the DV for vitamin B6
  • 8 percent of the DV for folate (vitamin B9)
  • 13 percent of the DV for iron
  • 7 percent of the DV for potassium
  • 47 percent of the DV for magnesium
  • 37 percent of the DV for phosphorus
  • 26 percent of the DV for zinc
  • 50 percent of the DV for copper
  • 94 percent of the DV for manganese

While these seeds are nutritious, their macronutrient profile is virtually the opposite of psyllium and very different from flaxseed. Their lack of fiber means that hemp seeds aren't suitable for all of the same culinary uses.

Chia: A Flaxseed Meal Alternative

Chia seed nutrition is the most similar to flaxseeds, although they're slightly lower in calories. Chia seeds can also act as thickening agents and binders, making them ideal flaxseed meal replacements in various dishes. According to the USDA, an ounce of chia seeds has:

  • 14 percent of the daily value (DV) for calcium
  • 12 percent of the DV for iron
  • 23 percent of the DV for magnesium
  • 20 percent of the DV for phosphorus
  • 12 percent of the DV for zinc
  • 29 percent of the DV for copper
  • 34 percent of the DV for manganese
  • 29 percent of the DV for selenium
  • 15 percent of the DV for thiamin (vitamin B1)
  • 16 percent of the DV for niacin (vitamin B3)

Chia seeds' macronutrients are also much more similar to those of flaxseed. Each ounce contains 4.7 grams of protein and 12 grams of carbohydrates. They are slightly higher in net carbs compared to flaxseeds, with 9.8 grams of fiber in an ounce.

Read more: 10 Ways to Get the Health Benefits of Chia Seeds in Your Diet

Each ounce of chia seeds also has 8.7 grams of fat, in which all but 0.9 grams are made up of healthy unsaturated fats. Chia seeds could be considered even richer in healthy fats compared to flaxseed, though.

According to a July 2013 study in the Journal of Food Science and Technology, chia seeds have more essential polyunsaturated fats than flaxseed. They specifically have more of two essential fats your body isn't able to produce: alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid. Chia seeds may also have more beneficial bioactive compounds than flaxseeds.

The same study showed that chia seeds can contain more antioxidants than flaxseeds — especially golden flaxseeds.

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